Families on Skid Row to be targeted for services

first_img “But if a mother is walking down the street with her children and doesn’t have a place to go, I don’t consider that abuse,” Adamson said. “I continuously balance that against the fact that we need to ensure children, if they are removed, are put in a foster system we can all have faith in as well, because it’s had its problems.” Troy Anderson, (213) 974-8985 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Concerned by the large number of families living on Skid Row, the Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to direct officials to visit each shelter daily to ensure eligible families receive public benefits. Last December, the supervisors voted to declare zero-tolerance to families living on Skid Row and to provide them with an array of services. But in the first six months of the year, 358 families were contacted by the county’s Skid Row Outreach Team, including 199 families that declined referrals to county welfare offices for food stamps and hotel vouchers. “The environment has nothing positive about it,” board Chairwoman Gloria Molina said. “We know the number of sexual predators in the area, the derelicts, the drug abusers. It is not a place where a child should be.” Molina also directed the County Counsel’s Office to explore potential changes in the law that would allow the county to remove children from “neglectful and abusive” situations on Skid Row and place them in foster care. “Some people believe as long as the shelter and the child are clean there is nothing wrong with living on Skid Row,” Molina said. “I think those parents not willing to work with us may be subject to neglect laws. We need our lawyers to challenge whatever law it is to make those children safe.” Molina’s motion directs the Department of Children and Family Services to ensure that every child encountered on Skid Row is assessed and “appropriately referred.” Larry Adamson, president of The Midnight Mission, said the “very charged issue” boils down to what definition of abuse or neglect county officials would use in deciding whether to remove children from a homeless families. He said there are mentally ill parents who refuse county services and subject their children to living in a situation in most people’s minds that is abusive. center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Weeklast_img

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