Executive Council: Gay Jennings’ sermon at closing Eucharist

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Executive Council, Comments (2) Lee Powers says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Posted Apr 21, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Executive Council April 2012 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs]  The Rev. Gay Jennings,  Episcopal Church Executive Council member from the Diocese of Ohio whose term is ending,  preached during council’s closing Eucharist in Salt Lake City, Utah, April 20.Jennings’ sermon follows in full._____________________________________________________Episcopal Church Executive CouncilClosing EucharistApril 20, 2012The Rev. Gay JenningsDiocese of OhioMember, Executive CouncilIn the Name of God.  Amen.I’ll open with a poem that I have grown to love.The Swan by Rainer Maria RilkeThis clumsy living that moves lumbering as if in ropes through what is not done,reminds us of the awkward way the swan walks. And to die, which is the letting goof the ground we stand on and cling to every day,is like the swan, when he nervously lets himself downinto the water, which receives him gailyand which flows joyfully underand after him, wave after wave,while the swan, unmoving and marvelously calm,is pleased to be carried, each moment more fully grown,more like a king, further and further on.The Church longs to be transfigured – changed into the likeness of Jesus – from glory to glory. I believe this is really what the conversations regarding structure are about. As Winnie Varghese has said, mission is the restoration of creation through covenant relationships. And structure, therefore, is the servant of mission. The servant of the restoration of creation.Matthew’s Gospel for the Feast of the Transfiguration tells the story of the transfiguration of Jesus on the mountaintop with Peter, James and John.The transfiguration happens immediately after the confession of Peter at Caesarea Phillippi. Jesus had asked the disciples to describe how they understood him having traveled together some time. Peter is always Peter. Peter blurted out “You are the Messiah.” Jesus then tells his disciples and friends that he will suffer and die in Jerusalem and Peter quickly objects.Peter is rebuked by Jesus and then gives the disciples a clear choice. They can follow him if they accept that danger that lies ahead. If, however, they put their personal safety first, they must leave.Six days later, Jesus then takes Peter, James and John to the top of a mountain where they see Jesus transfigured and are given a glimpse of the glory of the Christ soon to be revealed. They were given a glimpse of the future – they were given hope in the place of fear, and doubt, and confusion.You and I have seen people both transfigured and transformed throughout the Church during this triennium as we have served on Executive Council together. Our actions as a governing body impact the hearts, souls, bodies and minds of the people known and unknown, many of whom are in need of transformation of one sort or another. Yet, the longer I serve this Church we love so much, the more worried I become about the exhaustion I see in some of the servants. You are tired after serving Executive Council for three years, or six years, or longer as staff or officers. Maybe there are people in your congregations, your dioceses and your provinces who are weary and wish for transfiguration.The poet David Whyte writes of his personal fall into exhaustion. He went to a spiritual friend and the following exchange took place.“Brother David? Tell me about exhaustion.”He looked at me with an acute, searching, compassionate ferocity for the briefest of moments, as if trying to sum up the entirety of the situation and without missing a beat, as if he had been waiting all along, to say a life-changing thing to me.He said, in the form of both a question and an assertion: “You know that the antidote to exhaustion is not necessarily rest?”“What is it, then?”“The antidote to exhaustion is wholeheartedness. You are so tired through and through because a good half of what you do here in this organization has nothing to do with your true powers, or the place you have reached in your life. You are only half here, and half here will kill you after a while. You need something to which you can give your full powers. You know what that is; I don’t have to tell you.You are like Rilke’s Swan in his awkward waddling across the ground; the swan doesn’t cure his awkwardness by beating himself on the back, by moving faster, or by trying to organize himself better. He does it by moving toward the elemental water where he belongs. It is the simple contact with the water that gives him grace and presence. You only have to touch the elemental waters in your own life, and it will transform everything. But you have to let yourself down into those waters from the ground on which you stand, and that can be hard. Particularly if you think you might drown.”  (Excerpted from Crossing the Unknown Sea: Work as a Pilgrimage of Identity, David Whyte, Riverhead Books, New York, 2001)I don’t know about you, but drowning – now there is something to be afraid of. We are afraid of death – both physical death and those little deaths that are part of transformation. Death, we all know from hard experience, means loss and change, and in the case of personal or corporate transfiguration and transformation, it likely means letting go of something, while embracing a wholehearted approach in our leadership.  As the familiar hymn says, “New occasions teach new duties.”Long ago, I heard a great story about people in Africa who hunt monkeys in order to sell them to zoos around the world. Those who know me well know I detest zoos, but I digress. The hunters use an ingenious method to trap the monkeys. They hollow out a gourd, and they make a small opening on the top of the gourd. At the bottom of the gourd, they put peanuts in the gourd. The hunters hide and the monkeys come to investigate. The monkeys put their hands in the gourd, grab the peanuts and then they cannot get their hands out. The monkeys don’t let go of the peanuts and they scream and yell and the hunters come and pick them up, put them in cages, and ship them to the zoos. I just want to shout at the monkeys and say let go of the peanuts!  Let go of the peanuts and you can live free and swing in the trees, and have babies and eat bananas and have a great monkey life. Let go and be free!As a servant in the Church, as a person who works in a variety of ways through a variety of covenant relationships, I know I need to look at the peanuts in my life – what do I need to let go of in order to be free and changed into His likeness from glory to glory? What do I need to let go of so I can grab on to something that which is life-giving and transformative? What do we as a Church need to embrace, to grab onto, in order to be free and changed into His likeness from glory to glory?As the Church engages in surprisingly passionate conversations about structure, governance, roles, responsibilities, canonical and constitutional amendments, rules of order, CCABs, budgets, staff, and General Convention, we need to remember that we are about the business of the restoration, together.No more false choices between mission and governance. No more false wars between individuals or groups. No more jockeying for turf or control. Rather, we have to find ways to move forward together, and envision and incarnate the future God calls us to embrace – and I pray that we will throw ourselves into it with wholehearted abandon.As leaders, we need to consider how we might exercise new models of leadership. Nicholas Petrie of the Center for Creative Leadership writes about interdependent leadership. He suggests that interdependent leadership is  a collaborative enterprise and more a shared process than an individual skill set. Who the leader is becomes less important than what is needed in the system and how we together can produce it.This kind of leadership is more likely to flourish when there is open flow of information, flexible hierarchies, distributed resources, distributed decision-making, and loosening of centralized controls. Petrie writes, “We are still at the early stages of thinking about leadership development at a collective level, but I have no doubt that future generations will see networked, interdependent leadership as a natural phenomenon, the way of the world.” We need to pay close attention to this.As I talk to people around the Church, people are clear that there is a need for something new, people are passionate, but there aren’t many concrete suggestions offered, and some are not sure about what the structure of the Church actually consists of. The good news is that people care about how we are structured. Structure is simply the arrangement of relations between the parts or elements of something complex.Structure in the Church is simply the arrangements of relations between the parts or elements for the purpose of the restoration of creation through covenant relationships to the glory of God. How we go about restructuring is as important as how we restructured. Will we be true to our Baptismal Covenant? Will we be courageous and brave?  Will we accept what Jesus offers us?We are offered nothing less than the gift of transfiguration and it is ours for the taking. We are given the gift of being transfigured into His likeness from glory to glory. To be transformed as a Church, we have to be transformed as individuals.How are you and I transfigured by the dazzling light of the transfigured Christ? How are we changed into His likeness from glory to glory? What makes the morning star rise in our hearts? How does that happen?You are transfigured into His likeness every time you recognize that sin and death and brokenness are not the last word.You are transfigured into His likeness when you work for justice and peace, when you will not accept the diminishment of any person, when you help others claim their dignity.You are transfigured into His likeness when you pray – for yourself and others.You are transfigured into His likeness when you eat the bread of life and drink the cup of salvation.You are transfigured into His likeness when you believe in the grace and transformation that comes to all of us simply because God loves us.You are transfigured into His likeness when you trust in the power of God to recreate, to bring us free out of debt, and beauty out of chaos.The voice from the cloud said “This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased.”  That same voice, the voice of God says this:This is my daughter Bettye Jo, and my daughter Winnie, and my daughter Debbie, and my daughters Blanca, Bonnie, Rosalie, Marian,  Martha, Anne, Angela,  Katharine, Vycke, Sandye, Lelanda, Bronwyn, Kathryn, Sally,  Neva Rae, Lori, Mary Frances, Stephanie, Nancy, Carla, Dylan, Dinorah, Lee, Katie, Anita, Jane, Cecy, Hisako, Rosalie, Fredrica, Joyce, and Elizabeth.My beloved. With her I am well pleased.This is my son Mark, and my son Gregory, and my son Paul, and my sons David, Cristobal, Terry, Tim, Wendell, Jon, Chuck, Francisco, Bryan, Sam, Del, Paul, John, Jim, Stacy, Silito, Alex, the two Brians, Steve, Butch, Kurt, Bruce, and Michael. My beloved. With him I am well pleased.You are transfigured into His likeness when you rejoice in the fact that you are the beloved child of God and that your belonging is close to God’s heart in a place that is saved for you and for you alone.Amen. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April 22, 2012 at 6:38 am “The antidote to exhaustion is wholeheartedness.”Thank you, Gay, for this incredible insight from David Whyte. I recently retired. I was running on empty. I was no longer interested in trying to fix problems in the church, in any church, in any part of the church. I thought I needed rest.I have gotten a lot of rest over these last ten week. I have rediscovered a full night’s sleep.Now that I’m rested, I still don’t want to fix problems in the church. I want to remember what it was that caused me to give my life to Christ and to let everything else go.You are right: we see tired people all around us. We can’t fix our church; only Christ can. And I know He still loves His Church, which means He still loves us. We can’t fix each other; we can only be like those friends who climbed up on the roof of a house and let their friend down on a mat so that Jesus could heal him. Those friends may have been tired, but they were wholeheartedly devoted to bringing their friend to Jesus so he could be made whole again.My prayer for all of us in our beloved church is that we will carry one another back to Jesus.God bless you and thank you. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 22, 2012 at 12:22 pm Gay, your insight into the cure for exhaustion certainly rings true for this tired old Christian. Wholeheartedness, wait for me. I’ll “get it” sooner or later – I teach women inmates at the local jails and see the transfiguration weekly as they show me how they care for each other. Sometimes I feel they enjoy more freedom than I do. Thanks for your reminder of where the path lies. Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Betsy Willis says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Executive Council: Gay Jennings’ sermon at closing Eucharist Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Episcopal bishops issue A Word to the Church

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 16, 2016 at 7:52 pm Where can one find a copy of the Bishops’ statement in Spanish? Aaron J. Angel says: March 16, 2016 at 12:56 pm So beautifully written and profoundly powerful… I am immensely grateful for the leadership provided by our House of Bishops at this time. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS March 17, 2016 at 10:06 am This reads like an effort to be on the record as opposing right wing politics while doing nothing to speak directly though belatedly to underlying issues and instead magically leapfrogging to reconciliation. If the church wants to make a difference here and now it is time to shout the message publicly on a daily basis–to shout it from the rooftops in the press, to ring the church bells daily in a call to goodness, to take public risks rather than give retreat summations delivered anonymously. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Steve Catanich says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 16, 2016 at 3:16 pm Well said. Definitely praying. Hoping more messages like this get into the public eye to counteract the public rhetoric we hear so loudly on the other side. Paul Ambos says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ann Schumann-Ousley says: Comments (51) Sam Kincade says: [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The House of Bishops of The Episcopal Church, meeting in retreat, unanimously approved the following Word To The Church.A Word to the ChurchHoly Week 2016“We reject the idolatrous notion that we can ensure the safety of some by sacrificing the hopes of others.”On Good Friday the ruling political forces of the day tortured and executed an innocent man. They sacrificed the weak and the blameless to protect their own status and power. On the third day Jesus was raised from the dead, revealing not only their injustice but also unmasking the lie that might makes right.In a country still living under the shadow of the lynching tree, we are troubled by the violent forces being released by this season’s political rhetoric. Americans are turning against their neighbors, particularly those on the margins of society. They seek to secure their own safety and security at the expense of others. There is legitimate reason to fear where this rhetoric and the actions arising from it might take us.In this moment, we resemble God’s children wandering in the wilderness. We, like they, are struggling to find our way. They turned from following God and worshiped a golden calf constructed from their own wealth. The current rhetoric is leading us to construct a modern false idol out of power and privilege. We reject the idolatrous notion that we can ensure the safety of some by sacrificing the hopes of others. No matter where we fall on the political spectrum, we must respect the dignity of every human being and we must seek the common good above all else.We call for prayer for our country that a spirit of reconciliation will prevail and we will not betray our true selves.The Episcopal Church House of Bishops met in retreat March 11 – 15 at Camp Allen Conference Center in Navasota, TX. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 16, 2016 at 1:46 pm What a very polite and lengthy way to say Nothing. This must have been written by a Politician. March 22, 2016 at 10:56 pm You are correct. Same letter placed in Spanish. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 16, 2016 at 2:47 pm What, specifically, are you pointing to in this statement. Are we to read into it our own particular biases? Moral relativism seems the order of the day. Elevating evil doers as characterizing the country (“shadow of the lynching tree”) while excusing the manner in which ** the margins of society are turning on US ** just adds to the polarization that is fomented by radical Left and reactionary Right. Political correctness is the gateway to the moral relativism because it punishes the free expression of ideas that must be considered where obvious problems exist. March 16, 2016 at 8:56 pm As a Biblical historian: “the ruling political forces of the day tortured and executed an innocent man” actually “the ruling religious forces of the day caused the torture and execution of an innocent man at the hands of the Romans.”Let’s not try to make what happened 2000 years ago about the Presidential Election of 2016. Let’s keep the Scripture true to the message, please. Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 28, 2016 at 10:17 am So sad when supposedly educated Bishops cannot draft something meaningful instead of something vague and meaningless. If you have something to say, say it! Willam A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Max Hill says: Sandra K Llewellyn says: Dan Tabizon says: Vicki Gray says: March 16, 2016 at 1:12 pm Great message! Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Max Hill says: Submit a Job Listing March 22, 2016 at 2:54 pm My Spanish is poor, but I think this is it:https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2016/03/18/un-mensaje-de-los-obispos-episcopales-a-la-iglesia/ Ben Johnson says: March 16, 2016 at 6:52 pm As a Biblical historian: “the ruling political forces of the day tortured and executed an innocent man” actually “the ruling religious forces of the day caused the torture and execution of an innocent man at the hands of the Romans.”Let’s not try to make what happened 2000 years ago about the Presidential Election of 2016. Rector Knoxville, TN Joan Head says: Paul Rider says: March 17, 2016 at 5:29 pm Come Loving God, most mysterious one, and touch our land with your healing love. Grant us ears to hear your call to love and serve each other and the stranger in our midst. Amen March 17, 2016 at 11:08 am Bishops’ did a great job of “Taking A Stand.” Every election cycle there will be candidates that sell the dream of becoming a Utopia under their reign. I never see candidates visiting skid rows or prisons, or championing causes for the most disenfranchised. Why, they don’t vote, it doesn’t make for good press, and Voters would find helping those untouchables as not important. Most People elect politicians that have their similar concerns, their best interests, in mind. As Christians, Our Baptismal Covenant requires sometimes the opposite of politics. By acting on the Five Marks of Mission, we see that nonvoters and the environment are clearly within our realm of caring. No matter what our direction (Left, Right, or Center), our Savior, through Divine FÍat, was elected two thousand years ago. If His Kingdom is to Come on Earth, which candidate, if any, speaks to that? Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls March 16, 2016 at 5:20 pm The Bishops’ statement comes from the heart of the Gospel. It reminds us that, in the heat and passion of public debate and differing views, we run the risk of overlooking what we hold from our faith as being dear and pre-eminent. That reminder applies to all of us, whether we tend to stand at the right, the center or the left in the political/social spectrum. Comments navigation Newer comments Submit a Press Release Steve Catanich says: Constance Jennings says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 16, 2016 at 12:35 pm Was this by any chance cc’d to Abp. Justin Welby? Posted Mar 16, 2016 March 16, 2016 at 6:21 pm Interesting that even a message of reconciliation and hope can be met with division and fear. I applaud our Bishops today. Episcopal bishops issue A Word to the Church The Revd Sarah V. Lewis says: March 17, 2016 at 11:22 am Agree, it’s very frightening. I don’t know who the fascists are but I can plead to God to tell us and not leave us blind. March 16, 2016 at 6:06 pm When the messengers of God sent “A Word to the Church” the Body of Christ, God’s people said: Amen!! Amen!! March 16, 2016 at 6:02 pm Hollow words. The Episcopal Church like every other supports agenda of the right wing fanatics. Without that support we probably wouldn’t be in the position we’re in. They call for “prayer,” and we all k of how much good that goes. I’m glad it allows all you self righteous hypocrites to deny the responsibility for your voting record . Wilmot T. Merchant, II says: Daar Fisher says: March 18, 2016 at 2:42 pm Honorable Bishop Johnson, interesting how you are picking up the secular mood of leftist politics and bringing up Nazi Germany. I hope you don’t think that that has a spiritual import for us today. Where is our message of hope “this is my fathers world.” Where is our faith in the God who will allow us “to pass safely through the tribulations of ou age?” Bishop Joel Marcus Johnson says: Cathy Kinkade says: Marybeth Wright says: Monte Robinson says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: March 16, 2016 at 11:47 am WOW! What a powerful message! I agree with it 100%!!! March 17, 2016 at 1:30 pm I agree with the Bishops in the thrust of their letter. But the Golden Calf was made from what they plundered leaving Egypt and they made it because they thought/feared Moses and God had abandoned them. Today’s “golden calf” has been forged by the same sense of fear and a deeper resentment of a perceived abandonment. Until we deal with that, we can only expect more. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Steve Lindsay says: Lynn Vera says: Jim Himes says: Ryan MacConnell says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 16, 2016 at 2:38 pm Many thanks to the House of Bishops. I see so many parallels to Germany in the 1930s, in which out-of-control political rhetoric and mob violence made it possible for Adolph Hitler to seize control not by coup but election. With anti-Semitism rising against Jews and Muslims both abroad and at home, we have much to keep in check. Slovenia, for example, has recently elected a fascist leader who has vowed to make life miserable for the Romas. So, yes, the spirit of reconciliation should be the prayer for our country – but also vigilance and the calling out of the fascists of our own day, who, like Amalek of old, would seize the most vulnerable of our day. Carrie Heiman says: March 18, 2016 at 2:44 pm Steve Lindsey, that is so beautiful and so infused with divine energy! Thank you so much. Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab March 17, 2016 at 9:46 am Thank you for the BOLD leadership of our bishops. Gregory Willmore says: March 21, 2016 at 3:10 am Christ is our Hope. March 17, 2016 at 10:52 am Where the Roman leaders not gods? They only suffered the Jews to maintain the illusion of their power. The ruling religious forces were the ruling political forces of the day. The distinction between the two is a modern one that ought not be read into ancient writings. March 17, 2016 at 1:40 am Darr, You are right the statement says nothing! Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments navigation Newer comments Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ March 19, 2016 at 9:34 am Well written and the best comment I have read so far. Rector Bath, NC March 17, 2016 at 12:29 am Daar Fisher that is a righteous statement !! March 16, 2016 at 9:01 pm Sorry –but at some point the Episcopal Church is going to have to take a stand like others for what is right and quit trying to appeal to all. It is not sacrificing the hopes of others by not embracing every weird thing that comes along. We will not betray ourselves if we follow Gods word. Not sure this is happening. Also, do not think it is the faithful that may be on the wrong path but the leadership. House of Bishops, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 28, 2016 at 2:05 pm Amen Paul. Me too. House of Bishops Spring 2016 Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Richard Bidwell says: Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Steve Schneider says: Rector Shreveport, LA Michael Russell says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Michael Craig Patterson, Reno, Nevada says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Daar Fisher says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 16, 2016 at 7:31 pm Hmmmm…no mention of the “lynching tree” called abortion on demand, support by TEC. Rector Martinsville, VA March 17, 2016 at 12:26 am Jim Himes I couldn’t agree more with what you have posted. If any church has lost its way, it would be the Episcopal Church. I will continue to pray for all denominations asking God to bring to light the error of their ways and return to the gospel preached by the Apostle Paul. March 18, 2016 at 1:19 am The “margins of society” are indeed turning on those who have systematically abused them. It’s called “survival instinct.” You might find it helpful to avoid name calling, and read the statement by our Bishops along with the words of Christ as taught in the Gospels. Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 16, 2016 at 4:47 pm This church has lost itself. Trevor David says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL David Johnson says: March 17, 2016 at 1:46 am Is this directed at the Bernie Sanders supporters and BLM activists who started the violence at the Trump rally in Chicago? March 17, 2016 at 1:46 am This is good, but the time has come to be more explicit, more forceful. We are on the edge of an abyss. Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 16, 2016 at 7:13 pm I applaud the message that our bishops have sent. The church must stand up against the hate and bigotry that is poisoning the hearts of many of our citizens in this election year by certain political candidates and condemn it as contrary to the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ and His gospel of love and mercy. Hate and bigotry is not only unchristian but it is contrary to our American values. I believe our presiding bishop should declare a day of prayer and fasting prior to the general election and should publicly condemn this cycle of hate and violence that the Evil One has imposed upon our beloved nation. Enough is enough. The church must pray, fast and then do something about it. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Hugh Hansen PhD says: Natalie Bishop says: Hugh Hansen PhD says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Robert Wilson says: March 18, 2016 at 1:22 am You made the association to “right wing politics,” the Bishops didn’t. Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

London churches plant trees to make neighborhoods more ‘bee friendly’

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC London churches plant trees to make neighborhoods more ‘bee friendly’ Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Environment & Climate Change Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Anglican Communion News Service] A tree-planting program for London’s churches supported by the mayor of London is aiming to make neighborhoods greener and more attractive for bees. The tree plantings will also offer an opportunity for churches to organize events and ceremonies that involve members of other faiths in their parishes to celebrate and help to enhance the environments that people of all faiths and no faith share. The project is supported by the diocesan bishops.Full article. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Feb 20, 2017 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Bethlehem accepting nominations for bishop

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls House of Bishops Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bethlehem accepting nominations for bishop Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img [Diocese of Bethlehem] The search committee for the ninth bishop of the Diocese of Bethlehem is now accepting nominations. Information about the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem and the process for nominations can be found here.The person elected will succeed the Rt. Rev. Sean Rowe, who was elected provisional bishop in 2014. Rowe is also bishop of the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania.The deadline for nominations is Sept. 11 and the deadline for applications is Sept. 18. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Aug 7, 2017 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Elections, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

This New York priest is on a mission to help…

first_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Parishioner and volunteer Nathalie Abejero and the Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, associate rector of Church of the Incarnation in New York, tell a hotel desk clerk at New York Marriott Marquis about the Saving Our Adolescents from Prostitution (S.O.A.P.) Project, asking that staff use soaps labeled with a toll-free help hotline for sex-trafficking victims. Photo: Amy Sowder[Episcopal News Service] She strode through midtown Manhattan with purpose, her black tote bag held close as she dropped a dollar into the jangling coffee can of a street person stationed on a corner. Weaving around the city sidewalks in her flowered pencil skirt, black flats and black tank with a clerical collar, the Rev. Adrian Dannhauser had four destinations on her list that evening — all upscale hotels where she hopes her efforts make a dent in revealing the horrific secret right under everyone’s noses.Child sex trafficking happens at pretty much every hotel, whether it’s glitzy or seedy, Dannhauser and survivors say. The average age a child is forced into prostitution is 13. Human trafficking, for labor or sex, is the second-leading crime in the world, including the United States, according to the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF). And one in three children is solicited for sex within 48 hours of running away or becoming homeless.A mother of a daughter who’s almost 9, Dannhauser wants every hotel employee to be trained to recognize the signs and know what to do about it. She wants the children, usually girls, forced by threats, violence and drugs to have sex with countless men behind the hotel room doors, to find a soap in the hotel bathroom with a sticker on the wrapper providing a toll-free hotline to call for help.“We’re ‘soaping up’ midtown,” Dannhauser said as she led the way to the next hotel, carrying bags that each contained 100 hotel-sized labeled soaps and folders full of information. “I’ve talked to hotel staff who said they did see something ‘off’ and didn’t know what to do.”The Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, associate rector of Church of the Incarnation in New York, asks an employee at Fairfield Inn & Suites in New York whether he’s had training to spot and report sex-trafficking victims. She’s leading a committee at her church, as well as a diocesan task force, to help the victims escape and to spread awareness of the problem, which is rampant in the travel and tourism industry nationwide. Photo: Amy SowderThe associate rector of Church of the Incarnation on Madison Avenue brought along parishioner Nathalie Abejero, also a mother, for the hotel visits. They, along with the rest of her parish’s anti-trafficking committee of seven to 10 people, have visited close to 40 hotels in the past year. “It’s so widespread. It could be anyone: the nicest, sweetest neighbor of yours who you’d never guess,” Abejero said as she waited in the lobby of New York Marriott Marquis in the heart of Times Square.“It’s so sick,” Abejero said a moment before the pair approached the hotel’s check-in clerks.Dannhauser is the chairperson of the Diocese of New York’s Task Force Against Human Trafficking. She was recently selected as a New York Nonprofit Media 40 Under 40 Rising Stars honoree for her work to combat human trafficking.Why hotels and motels are ideal targetsThe majority of trafficking happens at hotels and motels, according to Polaris Project, a Washington D.C.-based organization dedicated to eradicating modern slavery globally.Unlike other venues, hotels and motels allow traffickers some anonymity. Traffickers can pay for rooms in cash and change locations easily, which makes it easier to avoid detection than using an apartment, car or legitimate business front, all of which are traceable back to the owners.The biggest problem is lack of awareness. Hotel staff and guests don’t realize that trafficking is happening, or how to recognize the signs. Even if they do sense that a situation is suspicious, they may not know how to report it or whether it’s worth reporting at all.There are two clear ways to draw the line between prostitution and sex trafficking. If a person under 18 is involved in commercial sex, he or she is being trafficked. Also, anyone 18 and older with a pimp is being trafficked.“Trafficking is lack of choice. Slavery is lack of choice,” Dannhauser said. “Obviously, with children, it pulls your heartstrings more.”Volunteer Nathalie Abejero tells a hotel check-in clerk at New York Marriott Marquis about the Saving Our Adolescents from Prostitution (S.O.A.P.) Project, asking that staff place into the housekeeping carts the special soaps labeled with a toll-free help hotline for sex-trafficking victims. Photo: Amy SowderOnline shopping for underage sexTraffickers also use the internet. Children are more expensive and are most often purchased in the adult or dating sections of classified advertising websites, such as Backpage.com, which sells everything from boats to Beanie Babies. It is second in popularity only to Craigslist. When the woman’s face isn’t photographed, it’s often a girl younger than 18. A recent U.S. Senate report said the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children states that 73 percent of all child trafficking reports it receives involve Backpage.Using a defense of freedom of expression from government censorship and being “merely a host of content created by others and therefore immune from liability under the Communications Decency Act,” the site has been embroiled in legal battles, from criminal charges against its founders and CEO, to politicians’ efforts to modify the federal law.Between 2010 and 2015, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children reported an 846 percent increase in suspected child sex trafficking, much of it online.A priest’s calling for advocacyDannhauser’s work is needed now more than ever.A former bankruptcy attorney, Dannhauser has no personal connection to this horrifying criminal epidemic, but during her contemplative prayer practice while in seminary, she felt a call from God to pursue this mission.She was resistant at first, but she felt compelled by the Holy Spirit to consider this cause.“It’s all about using the voice we have for the voiceless,” Dannhauser said. “Churches are good about service, but I don’t know that we always get the advocacy piece. I find this so energizing.”After Dannhauser’s committee worked on contacting hotels in the metropolitan area for almost a year, the group joined forces with the S.O.A.P. (Save Our Adolescents from Prostitution) Project in the summer of 2017.Volunteers stick labels onto hotel-sized soaps at the S.O.A.P. labeling party in July at Church of the Incarnation in New York. They’re working to spread awareness of child sex trafficking in hotels, and help the victims get out. Photo: Church of the IncarnationIn July, the committee had a S.O.A.P. labeling party, during which they stuck labels onto 2,000 bars of soap that provide a toll-free help hotline for victims to call. They deliver those soaps to the hotels along with a packet of other information, including a missing children’s page, a warning signs list and a hotline mouse pad.A survivor’s taleAnneke Lucas participated in the New York church’s labeling party and told her story, as well.Raised in Belgium, Lucas was sold by her parents to an exclusive sex-trafficking ring for wealthy politicians when she was 6, according to a “Real Women Real Stories” video on the Living Resistance website. For more than five years, she was raped and tortured. At puberty, she was in danger of being murdered, but she got out just in time.Today, Lucas is a mother and leader of an organization that brings yoga to prisons. Lucas, Dannhauser and other leaders advocating for trafficking victims are pushing for legislation to be passed to protect children.Anneke Lucas, a child trafficking survivor who is now a mother and leader of a group that brings yoga into prisons, told her story at the S.O.A.P. labeling party at Church of the Incarnation in New York. Photo: Church of the IncarnationConnecticut passed a groundbreaking piece of legislation — the first of its kind in the United States — requiring hotels and motels to post signs in a visible place spelling out what trafficking is. The notice must also contain information on how to get help by contacting the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline. The law also requires all hotel and motel staff in the state to receive training on how to recognize victims and activities commonly associated with human trafficking.“A law like this could help children who are trafficked in New York,” Lucas said in the video. A tiny hotel soap with a red label could be a trapped child’s saving grace. “I would have found a way to call the hotline, had I seen a notice,” she said.The S.O.A.P. ProjectFounded by Theresa Flores in Ohio, the S.O.A.P. Project is specifically focused on educating and increasing public awareness of the prevalence of human trafficking, in order to help trafficked survivors heal and also to prevent more teens from being victimized this way in the United States. Eighty percent of trafficked victims are women, and half are children, she said.S.O.A.P. representatives travel all over the United States to hold outreach workshops during large public events. The nonprofit organization partners with local groups to distribute millions of bars of soap wrapped with a red band that gives the National Human Trafficking Hotline number — 1 (888) 373-7888 — and resources to high-risk motels and hotels.Based in Ohio, the nonprofit S.O.A.P. Project helps local volunteer groups label soaps with a toll-free help hotline and trains the volunteers to contact hotels and spread awareness of child sex trafficking in the United States. Photo: Amy SowderTrained volunteers such as Dannhauser and Abejero offer the soap free of charge to hotels and motels, along with training to be able to identify and report sex trafficking when they see it in their establishments.An author and advocate, Flores, 52, is also a survivor of child sex trafficking. She came from a good Roman Catholic home with two parents and no abuse. She was taught to be abstinent until marriage. But when she was 15, a boy in school drugged her and raped her, and his cousins took photos. The boy threatened to post the photos all over school, at her church and at her father’s office if she didn’t “work” to get each photo back. Flores was so ashamed of what had happened to her that she didn’t tell anyone. She found herself being called in the middle of the night and driven to mansions where she was forced to have sex with old men. They didn’t know her name or even ask, except for one man, who seemed to not know she was underage. Her pimp rebuked him, saying “she has no name.” She remembers being kidnapped, drugged and beaten, taken far away to Detroit and pulled out of the car by her hair to an open hotel where 20 men waited for her. She was 16 by then, in a sea of men, auctioned off to highest bidder, over and over until she passed out.“Nobody knew this was going on to a kid like me,” Flores said in her TEDx Talk. The Code, as it’s commonly called, was developed by End Child Prostitution and Trafficking (ECPAT-USA), a nonprofit organization based in Brooklyn, New York, and part of ECPAT International. It’s the only voluntary set of business principles travel and tour companies can implement to prevent child sex tourism and trafficking of children. Those who sign The Code agree to establish a policy and procedures against sexual exploitation of children; train employees in children’s rights, the prevention of sexual exploitation and ways to report suspected cases; include a clause in contracts stating a zero-tolerance policy of sexual exploitation of children; provide information to travelers; and report annually on related activities.Several large travel suppliers have signed The Code, including Hampton Hotels, Hilton Worldwide and Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, according to Business Travel News.But while the heads of these hotel companies agree to this code, the training and education don’t always trickle down to every hotel location. That’s where efforts like those of Dannhauser’s committee come into play.Dannhauser is excited that the diocese’s sign-up letter is accessible to anyone in the Episcopal Church, so congregations can share it and educate their own hotels and travel agencies. The letter is downloadable here. She’s pressing to place a set of resolutions calling for the church to support the ECPAT code — similar to the New York diocesan resolutions — on the agenda at General Convention in the summer of 2018.“I also plan to have the toolkit ready at that time — the one for parishes to use to do their own hotel outreach with hotels in their communities,” Dannhauser said.How hotel staff respondOn this particular August evening, Dannhauser’s and Abejero’s second stop was at the 49-story marbled, modern New York Marriott Marquis in the heart of Times Square.The Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, associate rector of Church of the Incarnation in New York, and parishioner and volunteer Nathalie Abejero head to the hotel check-in desks at New York Marriott Marquis to spread awareness of training available to spot and report child sex trafficking, which is common in all kinds of hotels. Photo: Amy SowderThe manager-on-duty and two clerks at the hotel’s front desk were friendly and willing to discuss sex trafficking when the two women showed up unannounced. Hotel employees undergo sex trafficking training with a video every six months, they said.“It’s something we’re actively on the lookout for,” the manager said.Sometimes the volunteers can’t even get a manager to come out to speak to them; it’s hard to tell whether it’s because the manager is busy or just not interested. Most desk clerks and managers said they are aware of the problem and several of them had training by video. Others admitted they didn’t know what to do when they suspected something was awry. They all took the soaps.“It was a better response than I expected,” Abejero said.— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service, and a writer and editor in Brooklyn, New York.Editor’s note: Combatting human trafficking will be on the agenda during the Oct. 2-6 meetings of the moderators and primates (leaders) of the Anglican Communion’s 39 provinces. Archbishop Francisco de Assis da Silva, primate of the Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil, explains why here. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Revd Sarah V. Lewis says: September 21, 2017 at 9:08 pm I think such a description is important in these situations, what ever the gender is. If a male priest was engaged in the same actions as this woman is, perhaps he would dress in a less formal way than wearing a black suit along with his clerical collar. How one is perceived may affect one’s reception. A priest dressed in all in black is likely to be seen as someone trying to further his/her denomination, something unwelcome by many hotels. Jane Palmer says: September 22, 2017 at 10:34 am Very impressive article, with so much information and careful research. Thank you! September 23, 2017 at 12:33 pm What evidence is there that the soap message has been used by youth trapped in sex trafficking? September 23, 2017 at 5:13 am Great article! I learned a lot. I wonder if anyone here in the Harrisburg, PA area is participating in this prigram?! Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Her story is an example of how a child from any background, race or socio-economic status can become trapped in sex trafficking. These days, most people find prostitutes online, not by looking for streetwalkers, Flores said. “It’s basically fear,” Flores told Episcopal News Service. “These women are terrified and are being beaten and are threatened by the pimp, who is the trafficker. They tell you they know where your family is and get you addicted to drugs. They all use these tactics.”In these disgusting, deplorable situations, it’s almost guaranteed a trafficking victim will reach for the hotel room’s bar of soap. “That darkest moment is in those hotels, but they all go into the bathroom to clean up afterwards,” she said. That’s how the idea hatched to use soap as the way to reach the trafficked victims. If hotel managers don’t agree to place a labeled soap in each hotel room bathroom, volunteers suggest that they keep the soaps on the housekeeping carts for cleaning employees to place in the bathroom when they notice the signs.The signs include some obvious clues and some more subtle ones:• A man is checking in with a much-younger female.• A young woman looks a bit zonked out or bruised.• A young woman has no identification proof.• A hotel room is paid for in cash.• A hotel room is purchased by the hour or by the day repeatedly, or for extended stays longer than usual.• Several men are seen coming and going from one room.• Many more towels are requested than is typical.• Someone stands guard by the room door or is acting distrustful around security.If you suspect sex trafficking, call the police, FBI or the National Hotline at 1-888-373-7888, or text: HELP to BeFree (233733). For more information, visit www.soapproject.org, www.traffickfree.com and www.ecpatusa.org.Flores has given out close to a million soaps since she founded the organization more than six years ago.She targets her hotel efforts during big events. The Super Bowl, NASCAR races, Republican and Democratic conventions, the Indianapolis 500, entertainment awards shows, the Kentucky Derby and the Detroit Auto Show are a few. When there’s likely to be a flood of people into town for a short time, especially when it’s mostly men, the demand will rise.So, the supply follows. Typically, in Detroit, there are 200 ads of women for sale on Backpage.com, Flores said. But the female ads spike to 500 to 600 during the Detroit Auto Show.Advocacy within the Episcopal ChurchDannhauser wants to encourage this kind of advocacy work throughout the Episcopal Church at large. The priest got the Episcopal Public Policy Network to send an action alert about any related legislation going through U.S. Congress so that more Episcopalians could get involved. The Episcopal network created its own human trafficking page chock full of helpful information, from advocacy updates from U.S. Congress and ongoing efforts by local Episcopal churches to ways to contact local elected officials and resources provided by the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion.Dannhauser was critical in helping to pass a series of resolutions at the Diocese of New York’s annual convention in November. The resolutions encourage the diocese to prioritize doing business with those hotels, travel agencies and airlines that have signed the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct when traveling for church-related business. They also urge all parishes and individual Episcopalians to make those same choices in their business and personal travel.“And if we used a hotel or airline that hadn’t signed onto this code, then we’d try to sign them up; we have a letter for this and you can chat with the general manager about this,” Dannhauser said. “Anybody can do that kind of thing.” Submit an Event Listing This New York priest is on a mission to help children trapped in sex trafficking at hotels Hotel-sized soaps labeled with a toll-free hotline can help. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA September 21, 2017 at 8:20 pm Did the author of this article REALLY need to describe what the priest was wearing? Would she have done similarly if the priest had been a male? Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release September 21, 2017 at 5:33 pm Great article. This should really open some eyes.Thank you, Amy, Adrian, Anneke, and Church of the Incarnation. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed.center_img Micki Hoffmann says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 21, 2017 at 4:44 pm Thank you for this article. Thank you for the videos. Thank you for including the voices of survivors. Thank you for your fine, engaging writing. But, seriously? In an important story about the serious issue of sex trafficking and this priest’s important ministry does the second paragraph have to be about how the priest dressed? Would you have done that for male clergy? I think not. No one else’s clothing is described. Just the clergywoman. I might have expected something like this in 1987. Or, 1997. Maybe, maybe in 2007. But, it’s 2017. We’ve been ordaining women since 1974. I’m sorry but I’m so very tired of unconscious journalistic sexism. Please, as you raise awareness and conscientiousness about the misogyny and sexism that fuels the abuse and trafficking of women,young girls, and girl-children be aware of how it is you portray all women – especially ordained women. Thank you.Again, thank you for this article and the important work of Rev. Adrian Dannhauser. May God bless her, her brave leadership and her ministry. Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ann Grady says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Amy SowderPosted Sep 21, 2017 Rector Shreveport, LA Children, Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Roger Bowen says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rhonda Hebbard says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (7) Human Trafficking Episcopal Public Policy Network, Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Archbishop of Cape Town says ‘the ANC’s time may have…

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Time may be coming to an end for the “glorious movement” of the ANC, the Archbishop of Cape Town, Thabo Makgoba, said in an outspoken attack during a discussion on the Power98 radio program “Power Talk.” The ANC – the African National Congress – has its roots in the anti-Apartheid struggle. It was the party of Nelson Mandela and has formed the government in South Africa since the end of Apartheid.Get the entire article here. Africa, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Nov 1, 2017 Archbishop of Cape Town says ‘the ANC’s time may have passed’ Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglican Communion Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Diocese of West Tennessee announces slate for election of 4th…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Diocese of West Tennessee announces slate for election of 4th bishop Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of West Tennessee has announced a slate of three nominees for election as its fourth bishop.The candidates are:The Rev. Marian Dulaney Fortner, rector, Trinity Episcopal Church, Hattiesburg, MS, Diocese of MississippiThe Rev. Sarah D. Hollar, rector, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Huntersville, NC, Diocese of North CarolinaThe Rev. Phoebe A. Roaf, rector, St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Richmond, VA, Diocese of VirginiaMore information on the nominees can be found on the search website.Nominations by petition may be filed until 5 p.m. on October 5. Information can be found here.The fourth bishop will succeed Bishop Don E. Johnson, who was consecrated as the third bishop of the Diocese of West Tennessee in June 2001. He was preceded by Bishop James M. Coleman, consecrated in 1994, and Bishop Alex D. Dickson, Jr., consecrated in 1983.The election is scheduled for Nov. 17, during the diocesan convention. After receiving the canonical consent of the majority the church’s diocesan standing committees and bishops with jurisdiction, the new bishop will be ordained and consecrated May 4, 2019. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted Sep 21, 2018 Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Elections Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

Christian visitors bring hope to immigrant detainees facing tough odds…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Immigration, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Christian visitors bring hope to immigrant detainees facing tough odds in New Hampshire jail Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Maggie Fogarty, who helped create the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program six years ago, meets with a detainee on Nov. 5 at the Strafford County jail in Dover, New Hampshire. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Dover, New Hampshire] Few items hitch a ride with the Rev. Mark Pendleton through the entrance of the Strafford County Department of Corrections every Monday morning. More important are the words of hope and the friendly smile he transports to the dozens of immigrants locked away inside the jail.“My task is to show a human face, that they’re not a number, they’re a person,” said Pendleton, one of about 10 volunteers with the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program. “We try to be the face of Christ to them in a very tough moment.”After leaving cellphone and wallet in his pickup truck and handing his driver’s license to the desk officer, Pendleton passes through the metal detector. On the other side he collects his keys, a Spanish-language Bible and an accordion folder filled with paperwork detailing past detainee visits and photocopies of legal pamphlets that may help some of the immigrants win release or halt deportation.At a time of deep divisions in American society, when political battles are waged on battlefields far removed from the people affected by federal immigration policies, Pendleton and the visitation team bring no partisan motive to the Dover jail. Their presence promotes no agenda other than a pragmatic compassion rooted in their Christian faith.“The Christian message is a rather redundant message of love and forgiveness,” Pendleton said.The visitors’ assistance is welcomed by supervisors at the Strafford County jail in Dover, one of more than 200 prisons and jails across the country to hold detainees for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, part of the Department of Homeland Security. As the only such facility in New Hampshire, the Dover jail’s immigrant detainee population has increased dramatically in recent years, starting during the Obama administration, when the average daily number of immigrant detainees jumped from 30 in 2015 to 80 in 2016, according to a Concord Monitor report.Episcopalians interested in joining visitation programs or starting their own can find contacts and resources online from Freedom for Immigrants, a California-based nonprofit that tracks and supports such programs.This year, under President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy toward illegal immigration, the 495-bed jail has averaged more than 100 people targeted for federal immigration enforcement. Some are awaiting trial or serving sentences in unrelated criminal cases, but many of the immigrants are being held for no other reason than ICE suspects they are not in the country legally. They may only spend a brief time at the jail before ICE determines their next steps and moves them elsewhere, typically without revealing those moves to jail officials or the visitation team.Episcopal News Service was granted access to the jail’s inmate housing units and meeting rooms to report on the work of the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program, as well as Pendleton’s pastoral care for detainees who request it. ENS, escorted by a jail superintendent, spent much of the morning Nov. 5 shadowing Pendleton and four other volunteers to capture the substance of their interactions with immigrant detainees.To minimize the risk that these normally one-on-one conversations would be hindered by the additional presence of a reporter and jail supervisor, ENS refrained from asking questions of the detainees themselves. ENS also agreed to requests from the jail and the visitation team not to quote detainees directly or by name. The outlines of their stories, however, offer examples of what the visitation team members say are typical scenarios facing the detainees, some of whom are clinging to hope against long odds.The volunteers provide the detainees with general information and guidance about aspects of the immigration system, from applying for asylum to voluntarily leaving the country, though the team is necessarily clear about not being able to provide legal advice. They aren’t attorneys.“A lot of what we’re doing is just listening to people,” said Nancy Pape, one of the lead volunteers. “Just being heard is great for everybody.”Pape created the visitation program about six years ago with Maggie Fogarty, a New Hampshire official with the Quaker organization American Friends Service Committee. Pendleton, rector at Christ Episcopal Church in Exeter, joined the team two years ago, drawn partly by the prospect of putting his knowledge of Spanish to use. Though not officially a faith-based ministry, volunteers often bring a Christian perspective to the work.This Monday, they were joined by two other volunteers, Judith Cole and Sally Fleming. The group signed in around 8:20 a.m. and made its way through a pair of secure doors. Each opened and closed with a mechanical “CHACK-buzz-CHACK” facilitated by some invisible Oz on the other end of the intercom buttons.Down a flight of stairs, through more imposing doors, Jake Collins, the jail’s assistant superintendent for programs, led the way through a maze of halls that he said was designed to maintain an element of mystery. If an inmate somehow were to escape through one of the doors, the next step toward freedom wouldn’t be obvious.Helpful information and a chance to be heardThe detainees are not required to meet with the visitation team. As the volunteers move among housing pods, jail officers make announcements to the units to invite immigrants to come forward if they’d like the assistance. The number of detainees who accept the invitations varies week to week, sometimes depending on how active ICE has been in making arrests over the weekend.Immigrant detainees are most likely to be in their late 20s or early 30s, and 70 percent are jailed on immigration violations for a month or less, according to national statistics kept by Freedom for Immigrants, a California-based nonprofit aimed at ending immigrant detention. Mexico is the detainees’ most common home country, followed by El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, three countries facing high rates of forced displacement by violence.The Dover jail mirrors those trends. Certain Spanish words ring with regularity in the conversations between the detainees and the visitation team.Asking a detainee’s “país,” or country, is one of Pendleton’s icebreaker questions. He received his call to ordained ministry while in Colombia and has been to many of the immigrants’ home countries, allowing him to establish a rudimentary rapport with them in the jail. He and the other volunteers also ask how the detainees entered the United States, and whether they re-entered after a previous deportation, which can complicate the detainees’ efforts to remain in this country.“Familia” is another important detail. Having family members nearby can make a big difference, Pendleton said, as can an “abogado.”“Tienes un abogado?” Do you have an attorney?Without one, a detainee’s long odds become even longer, and there are few lawyers willing to take on immigration cases pro bono unless they see a reasonable chance for success, Pendleton said.The Rev. Mark Pendleton, rector at Christ Episcopal Church in Exeter, New Hampshire, has visited immigrants at the jail in Dover for the past two years. “We try to the be the face of Christ to them in a very tough moment,” he said. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter navigating the hallways and ending up deep inside the facility, the visitation team’s first stop was Housing Pod 1, or HP1 in the jail’s shorthand. Inmates here are assigned to one of several units arranged in an octagon around a raised guard station, from which officers can monitor the inmates’ activity.Units A and B are for female inmates. Unit D is maximum security, for disciplinary cases. Unit E is for inmates with special management needs, such as physical disabilities or court orders that prohibit contact with codefendants. Unit F is intake, for newly arrived inmates as they are evaluated for housing assignments.Unit C is divided in half, and on one side of a cinderblock dividing wall are the non-criminal ICE detainees, the only inmates who wear jail-issued maroon. Strafford County does little else to differentiate them from the general jail population. Like all inmates housed in Dover, “we try to treat them as fairly and humanely as possible,” Collins said.Assistant Superintendent Jake CollinsOn this day, Collins estimated Unit C held about 50 detainees in maroon clothes. As he spoke, he buzzed one man back into the unit to retrieve paperwork.The visitation team began setting up in a sparse meeting room, its off-white walls rising from a trapezoidal floor plan. Fluorescent bulbs radiated light down to the tile floor. Reinforced windows afforded views out to an equally sparse hallway and to an adjoining conference room. In the middle of the room, folding tables were arranged into a square.On one side of the square, Pendleton was speaking in Spanish with an immigrant about his case. Another man was with Fogarty researching an asylum application.Cole, with Pape translating, worked with a third man, who said he was from Nashua, New Hampshire, and wanted to apply for release on bond. Winning release doesn’t guarantee a win on the underlying immigration matter, but mounting a defense is more productive on the outside, in addition to being more comfortable.Immigrants in some cases ask to leave the United States immediately and voluntarily rather than sit in jail indefinitely, Pendleton said.ICE pays $83 a day to Strafford County for each federal detainee held in the Dover jail, and in 2017 those payments totaled nearly $2.8 million, according to the Concord Monitor. The jail, which first began housing ICE detainees in 2009, must pass rigorous federal inspections that check the facility on more than 600 standards, from the temperature of its dishwashers to the labels on its cleaning spray bottles.ICE also must OK the visitation program and its schedule before the volunteers, who receive agency-approved training, are allowed to meet with the detainees. The jail has worked to accommodate the team’s interest in serving these inmates.“If somebody can find something and help these guys out with their case, we encourage it,” Collins said.The Strafford County jail in Dover, New Hampshire, is one of more than 200 prisons and jails in the United States that hold federal immigration detainees and the one such facility in the state. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBehind bars, dozens face uphill immigration battlesAs the group wrapped up its visits with Unit C detainees, Pape moved to a different housing pod to offer assistance to immigrants being held in Unit G, where 72 inmates are monitored by a jail officer stationed behind a desk on the unit’s floor. Instead of maroon, these inmates wear brown to indicate they have active criminal cases pending.The unit is considered high-medium security. Inmates here have a range of amenities, including TVs, laundry facilities, showers and a simple workout area. The jail no longer accepts physical mail addressed to inmates, for security reasons, but each is assigned a durable tablet for receiving email.Pape set up in a meeting room not much different from the first – this time a rectangular floor plan, but the same off-white walls, overhead fluorescent lights, reinforced windows, tile floor. She put her files on a folding table and began talking with an immigrant in a brown jail shirt. He wanted help with paperwork for a child custody case, and handing Pape his jail-issued tablet, he showed her a picture of his girlfriend and their son, who also live in New Hampshire.He has another child in the United States, which is why he re-entered after being deported several times to his native Honduras, Pape said. Because of the re-entries, he was charged with an aggravated felony.“For the general public, you’re thinking something really dangerous, and this is just a case of him wanting to return to his children,” Pape said.Over in Unit H, a mirror image of Unit G, Pendleton asked the jail officer to let the inmates know he was there. She leaned into the intercom: “Gentlemen, we have representatives from immigration here if you’re interested.”Not exactly. “We’re not ICE. We’re volunteers,” he clarified. In the meeting room with the inmates he repeated the clarification in Spanish. “Somos voluntarios. Non somos el gobierno.”Initially he was joined by three men, who said they were from Somalia, Guatemala and El Salvador. A fourth entered behind them.“De qué país?” The late arrival said he was from Mexico.Pendleton first met with the man from Somalia, who had injured his legs in the jail and was seated in a wheelchair. He told Pendleton he had hoped to join a group of other Somali detainees who were sent back to their home country earlier in the year, and he wasn’t sure why federal officials left him behind in Dover.Pendleton said the visitation team would look into it. “You’ll be here next week, chances are, so I’ll update the team,” he said.Next, the man from El Salvador explained his situation, saying in Spanish that he had entered the United States in 2012 after a previous deportation.“Abogado?” Pendleton asked. No, the man said, but his wife and daughter live nearby.After asking the man how he felt about his case, Pendleton acknowledged it was “un poco complicado,” a little complicated, because of the re-entry. Pendleton took notes so the team could follow up next week.New Hampshire may seem a surprising locale for such conversations, with much of the national focus turned to immigration enforcement along the United States’ southern border. Texas, California and Arizona are the states with the largest numbers of immigrant detainees, each state averaging thousands each day, according to Freedom for Immigrants, which maintains a national network of affiliated visitation programs at 55 prisons and jails like the one in Dover.An estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the United States as of 2014, but only 10,000 were in New Hampshire, according to Pew Research Center, out of a statewide population of 1.3 million. Yet New England has become a regional flashpoint in the immigration debate. Immigrants here, legally or not, typically have moved north into the region in search of work or to join family, or they have crossed the border south from Canada, Pendleton said.About 40 people gather Nov. 6 outside the Norris Cotton Federal Building in Manchester, New Hampshire, for one of the ecumenical prayer vigils held in support of immigrants checking in with federal officials. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceSeveral faith-based groups, including the New Hampshire Council of Churches, have held regular vigils outside the federal building in Manchester because immigrants have been told to show up there with increased frequency for ICE check-ins. Some arrive fearing they will be told on the spot to buy an airline ticket to their native country and leave any family members behind, Fogarty said.The groups also organized a Solidarity Walk for Immigrant Justice in August, walking the 40 miles from Manchester to the jail in Dover over four days to raise awareness of the immigrants’ plight and to show support for them and their families.Immigrants, including those facing deportation, also have the support of the Episcopal Church, which in July passed multiple resolutions on immigration issues at its 79th General Convention in Austin, Texas.Messages of hope in times of despairAbout 40 people joined the prayer vigil Nov. 6 outside the Norris Cotton Federal Building in Manchester on a drizzly, overcast Election Day morning. Some participants ministered to the immigrants who arrived for their check-ins throughout the morning, while the rest of group joined a Jericho walk, seven times around the building in silence.“I know that no matter which party is in power, we have lots of creative work to be done,” the Rev. Gayle Murphy, a United Church of Christ pastor, told the participants before the walk.A day earlier, in the Dover jail, Pendleton explained how “difícil,” or difficult, some cases are that he reviews.“Some of these folks are just headed for deportation,” he told ENS. Sometimes, all they have left is hope.Esperanza.When it was the Mexican man’s turn, Pendleton asked his hometown and learned the man was from Vera Cruz. “Mucho calor” – very hot – Pendleton said, trying to break the ice.The young man smiled through a light beard, but his smile didn’t last long. He told Pendleton that he had been living in Danbury, Connecticut, with his family when he was arrested on a traffic violation. That traffic stop revealed he had re-entered the U.S. after a previous deportation.“Es difícil,” Pendleton told the man, whose mouth pinched slightly and face flushed with apparent anguish as the priest identified potential hurdles ahead. “No es imposible.”Not impossible to fight deportation, no, but Pendleton offered the man a photocopy labeled “Voluntary Departure Guide” in case he wanted to take that route instead.“No pierdas esperanza,” he said finally. Don’t lose hope.Pendleton’s last task of the morning was to meet with immigrants who had requested pastoral visits from him. For this, he slipped his white clergy collar into the neck of his black shirt and gave Collins a sticky note with the names.Collins said he would bring one of the inmates on Pendleton’s list into Interview Room S-1, but “the other guy went out this morning,” he said, referring to another inmate on the list who had been taken from the jail by ICE.S-1 was even smaller than the other meeting rooms, about 8-feet squared. Off-white walls. Overhead fluorescents. Reinforced windows. Laminate wood floor.Pendleton placed his Bible on the room’s folding table and took from his folder sheets of paper containing excerpted Bible passages in English and Spanish. Collins brought in an inmate who said he originally was from Costa Rica, and as the man sat down across from Pendleton the conversation alternated between languages.“Your English is good,” Pendleton complimented.The Costa Rican man has lived in the United States for 18 years, and, despite losing his right forefinger in a childhood injury, had been able to find work on a dairy farm in Vermont. He and his wife, who is from Argentina, have three teenage children, all born here. They are churchgoers, he said, and although he wasn’t sure the denomination, Pendleton guessed Episcopal by the man’s description of the church – kind of like a Catholic church, but with a female pastor.The man had been in the jail for a month and wore a green shirt, which Collins had said earlier indicates an inmate serving a criminal sentence, though the man’s crime wasn’t clear. Pendleton remarked that the man seemed upbeat and cheerful despite his difficult circumstances.“Tú lees la Biblia?” Do you read the Bible? The man said he did, and the two of them took turns reading out loud the Spanish passages on Pendleton’s sheets: Isaías 41:10, Salmos 145 and 2 Corintios 4.“Nos derriban, pero no nos destruyen,” St. Paul says in his second letter to the Corinthians.Struck down, not destroyed.“Es la verdad, no?” Pendleton asked. The man agreed, very true.They concluded the pastoral visit by reading the Prayer of St. Francis and the Lord’s Prayer together in Spanish. Their words were still ringing in the air as Pendleton shook the man’s hand and returned him to Collins in the hall.Donde hay ofensa, dar perdón;Donde hay duda, fe;Donde hay desesperación, esperanza.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By David PaulsenPosted Nov 20, 2018 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Episcopal Church eyes investing in gun manufacturers to press for…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Faith & Politics, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Gun Violence Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Bishops United Against Gun Violence, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church eyes investing in gun manufacturers to press for greater gun safety Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY center_img Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopalians join a interfaith group of demonstrators outside a Smith & Wesson facility in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 14. Photo: Victoria Ix/Diocese of Western Massachusetts[Episcopal News Service] Shareholder advocacy is nothing new for the Episcopal Church. With an investment portfolio worth about $400 million, the church has long used some of those investments to influence companies based on Christian principles and General Convention resolutions that set church policies and priorities.What’s new is one of the investment tactics the church plans to implement in the new year to address gun violence.General Convention passed a resolution in July that calls on Executive Council’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility to research investing in gun manufacturers to give the church a new voice in how those companies do business. The goal: “to minimize lethal and criminal uses of their products.”“We’ve never purposely gone out and bought [shares in] what we’d consider a bad actor in order to press the company to change behavior,” said Brian Grieves, the outgoing chair of the committee, which oversees the church’s shareholder advocacy.The resolution, B007, was proposed by Western Massachusetts Bishop Douglas Fisher, a member of Bishops United Against Gun Violence, who will take over for Grieves as committee chair in January. Fisher’s diocese is home to the headquarters of Smith & Wesson in Springfield, and in March he participated in a rally outside the gun manufacturer led by high school students in the wake of a deadly high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.Fisher acknowledged a “sense of frustration” among anti-gun violence advocates in response to Congress’ inaction. “The federal government is doing nothing about the public health crisis of gun violence,” he said. “So where can the church engage this big issue?”Shareholder advocacy already has produced results on the issue, such as the decision by Dick’s Sporting Goods in February to stop selling assault rifles at its Field & Stream stores and to stop selling any guns to customers under 21. The Episcopal Church, as a shareholder, was involved in the effort to pressure the chain based on the Sandy Hook Principles, named after the school in Newtown, Connecticut, where 20 students and six educators were gunned down six years ago, on Dec. 14, 2012.The Dick’s shareholder effort was aided by a coalition called Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility, or ICCR, an organization to which the Episcopal Church belongs that helps religious organizations pool their shareholder power. The group has recently worked with other of its members to do what General Convention urged: buy stock in a gun manufacturing company to influence corporate behavior. Eleven Roman Catholic organizations invested in Sturm, Ruger & Co. and in May were able to pass a shareholder resolution requiring the company to produce a report documenting how it is mitigating the harmful effects of its products.Fisher said the Episcopal Church intends to take its cue from ICCR and base its advocacy with gun manufacturers on principles developed by an anti-gun violence campaign called Do Not Stand Idly By.Such efforts aren’t opposed to gun ownership or the Second Amendment, Fisher said. “We’re really taking the approach of, why can’t gun companies act like car companies? Car companies are already trying to make their cars safer. … That’s good business practice. Why can’t gun companies go down the same path?”That’s a worthwhile case to make to those companies, said the Rev. Rosalind Hughes, a Cleveland-area priest who has been vocal and active in the fight against gun violence, but she isn’t sure investments are the best way to make that case.“My personal feeling is that I would prefer that we were not investing in the manufacture of guns in the first place,” said Hughes, rector at Church of the Epiphany in Euclid, Ohio. She favors greater lobbying efforts to pass stricter background checks, an end to gun-show loopholes and other reform measures. Bishops United Against Gun Violence has backed such measures as well.“The fact that we’re talking about this on the anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting doesn’t escape my notice,” Hughes told Episcopal News Service. “And the idea that the best that we can do is to invest in the manufacture of more guns in order to influence the landscape of guns in this country, that doesn’t sit well with me.”Grieves, who will remain on the Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility after stepping down as chair, describes actively investing in such companies as just one of the alternatives available to the church as it pursues a range of policy goals.“One size does not fit all,” he said. “It’s a strategic decision, and we’re going to have to look at how we arrive at those particular positions.”Even if this approach gets results on gun safety, it may not be the best approach for some of the church’s other priorities, which include climate change, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, indigenous people’s rights, corporate board diversity and an end to human trafficking.The church already owns shares in Caterpillar and Motorola, for example, and for years has been pressing those two companies to address human rights concerns related to their contracts with Israel in the occupied territories.“The purpose is to engage in dialogue and try to get the company to move toward making a change in its behavior,” Grieves said.General Convention, however, stopped short of approving a blanket divestment in Israel, which some critics of Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories have called for. Instead, bishops and deputies passed a resolution that calls on Executive Council to establish a “human rights screen” to determine the criteria that would justify divesting from specific companies based on their track records on human rights.The church also maintains so-called no-buy lists against investing in tobacco companies, for-profit prison companies and companies that earn more than a specific percentage of their business as military contractors.Fisher noted that affirmative investing is another approach the Episcopal Church takes, such as its support for companies doing good work in the Palestinian territories. The Bank of Palestine is one example.On climate change, the church seeks out investments aligned with its interest in caring for God’s creation. In 2015, Fisher’s diocese took the additional step of divesting from companies that profit from fossil fuels.It’s one thing to divest from oil in order to invest in alternative fuels, Fisher said, but that approach doesn’t work well in addressing gun violence. “What would you invest in that would impact the public health crisis of gun violence?”By investing in gun manufacturers, then, the church and its partners may be able to persuade those companies to take steps that will reduce the number of gun deaths. One example would be to adopt technology like fingerprint recognition, familiar to any iPhone user, that would lock guns for everyone except the owner.“Even if you don’t get shareholder resolutions passed, if you stay with it long enough … people start to take notice,” Fisher said. “It’s not something that gets ignored. It gets addressed.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC By David PaulsenPosted Dec 14, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Janani Luwum’s family and Idi Amin’s kinsmen reconcile on 42nd…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] The family of Archbishop Janani Luwum, the former primate of what was then the Church of the Province of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Boga-Zaire, have reconciled with kinsmen of former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, who ordered Luwum’s killing. Uganda’s Black Star News website reports that Canon Stephen Gelenga, from the same Kakwa tribe of Amin, delivered an emotional apology to Luwum’s family and the people of Acholi tribe during commemoration events over the past weekend.Read the full article here. Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Africa, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Janani Luwum’s family and Idi Amin’s kinsmen reconcile on 42nd anniversary of martyrdom Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Feb 20, 2019 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion last_img read more