QE IS RIGHT FOR AMERICA, SAYS BULLARD

first_img Share Quantitative easing boosts the economy, albeit “with a lag of six to 12 months,” according to the Federal Reserve’s James Bullard who was speaking in Washington DC yesterday. Bullard, who votes on the committee that controls US monetary policy, hit back at critics who accuse the policy of weakening the dollar and provoking inflation. Thursday 2 December 2010 7:29 pm whatsapp QE IS RIGHT FOR AMERICA, SAYS BULLARD Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org whatsapp Tags: NULL KCS-content last_img read more

NIGA strikes RG training agreement with RG24seven

first_imgRead the full story on iGB North America. Video-based responsible gambling training platform, RG24seven, has signed a new partnership with the National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA). NIGA strikes RG training agreement with RG24seven 30th September 2020 | By Aaron Noy This will see the service provider develop tribal-specific responsible gambling training for NIGA members. Responsible gambling “We are proud to be taking a proactive stance on responsible gaming and we are partnering with RG24seven to do this,” NIGA chair Ernie Stevens said. “Education and training of our Tribal employees is a critical component of our responsible gaming strategy and we are encouraging all members to provide this important training to their employees.” RG24seven also welcomes Jodi DiLascio to its team from her former role leading BMM Testlabs’ tribal gaming division to manage the NIGA partnership.center_img Topics: Social responsibility Responsible gambling AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address DiLascio will focus on providing RG24seven’s virtual training to tribal gaming enterprises across all tribal nations. Regions: US Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

Esher 22-19 London Welsh

first_imgSlemen’s cross field kick forced Josh Drauninu to concede a lineout and in their eagerness to win back possession Welsh were penalised. With Whitehead off it was another former Dragon, Ulph, who stepped up, only to see his kick hit the right hand upright.Three minutes later, though, from an almost identical spot, Ulph curled over what would prove the winning penalty after Welsh were adjudged to have taken out the jumper at the lineout.Welsh needed a response and they needed it quickly, and Ross provided it with two penalties in the space of a minute. No sooner had Esher looked to have established a winning lead than it was a one score game again.Welsh’s tails were up and a 50-metre Claassens break took the Exiles back to where they needed to be. The Exiles had upped the tempo with Esher firmly on the back foot.Aled Thomas had the chance to level the scores, only to see his attempt shave the right hand upright. A couple of penalties took Welsh up to the Esher line and their forwards pounded away, but the Esher defence held firm and time was not the Exiles’ friend as they slipped to their second away defeat of the season.Esher scorers:Try: Renwick; Con: Whitehead; Pens: Whitehead (4), Ulph (4).London Welsh scorers:Try: Gibson; Con: Ross; Pens: Ross (4).Esher: Chris Whitehead, Sam Ulph, Philip MacKenzie, Arran Cruickshanks, Jonny Hylton, David Slemen, Clive Stuart-Smith, David Millard, Kevin Corrigan, Ricky Nebbett, Robert Anderson, Rudzki Karl, Luke Wallace, Sam Stitcher, Shawn Renwick.Replacements: Samuel Smith for Whitehead (54min), Christopher York for Renwick (58min), Paul Barker for Rudzki (80+1min).Replacements not used: Timothy Tunnicliff, Alexander Walker, Neil Taylor, Andrew Garner.London Welsh: Errie Claassens, Liam Gibson, Hudson Tonga’uiha, Simon Whatling, Josh Drauniniu, Gordon Ross, Ben Stevenson, Michael Holford, Marc Breeze, Shawn Pittman, Martin Purdy, Matt Corker, Ben Russell, Michael Hills, Epi Taione.Replacements: Nick Runciman for Stevenson (61min), Lee Beach for Taione (63min), Lorne Ward for Holford (69min), Dominic Shabbo for Whatling (70min), Aled Thomas for Ross (70min), Vili Ma’asi for Breeze (79min).Replacement not used: Mike Powell.Yellow card: Epi Taione (31min). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Officials: Ref – Martin Fox; TJ’s Paul Kimber & Gareth Copsy.Half-time: 19-10center_img Sam Ulph – EsherMATCH: Esher 22 v 19 London Welsh. The ChampionshipChris Whitehead and Sam Ulph returned to haunt London Welsh as Esher took the derby bragging rights at Molesey Road on Friday night.The former Exiles kicked all but five of their side’s points, with Ulph landing what proved to be the winning penalty 13 minutes from time.The win ended Esher’s run of three matches without a victory, while ending Welsh’s two-match winning run, and the Exiles will have to wait until December 27 for the chance to extract revenge.When Whitehead spilt Gordon Ross’ straight forward kick it was an indication, if any were needed, of the testing conditions both sides faced at a rain sodden Molesey Road.Errie Claassens’ half break caught Esher offside and Ross turned down the chance to go for the posts, to nudge the ball into the corner, but Welsh couldn’t turn the opportunity into points as they were penalised for accidental offside.It fell upon Whitehead to open the scoring, after an overthrown Welsh lineout was gratefully accepted by Sam Stitcher and the Exiles were caught offside.But Welsh wiped that penalty out within minutes when Hudson Tonga’uiha found a gap, drew Whitehead and released Liam Gibson to race clear. Ross added the extras.Whitehead immediately cut the deficit to a point with his second penalty but when David Slemen put a testing the ball in behind the Exiles, Josh Drauniniu had the pace to win Johnny Hylton to touch down.Welsh’s attempts to play the game at pace were being frustrated, while Slemen and Whitehead were kicking intelligently.Claassens produced one scintillating break from under his own posts, but Welsh were struggling to build a period of concerted pressure.Esher, though, were beginning to get the upper hand and their forwards barged their way up to the Welsh line.A succession of penalties saw Whitehead probe the corner and although Martin Purdy produced one excellent steal, Esher pressure eventually told when Epi Taione was caught offside in front of his own posts and Whitehead edged Esher ahead.Esher were playing for territory and playing it well, and when the ball broke loose as Gibson was forced back on half way, it was hacked and Robert Anderson dived on it.Shawn Renwick fed Hylton and although Ben Stevenson produced a try saving tackle, Renwick drove over from close range. Whitehead added a superb conversion close to the left hand touchline and added three more when Welsh were penalised at a scrum on their own 22, despite Taione having just returned to the field to swell the Exiles’ pack.Welsh needed half time to regroup and whatever was said looked to have had the desired effect when the Exiles’ early pressure was rewarded with a Ross penalty.The Exiles were immediately back in the Esher 22 thanks to two fine touch finders from Claassens, giving the home side a taste of their own first half medicine.With Welsh pressing, Esher then lost the excellent Whitehead to injury, but the frustration was beginning to build for the visitors as they struggled to turn possession and dominance in the scrums into points.last_img read more

Christian visitors bring hope to immigrant detainees facing tough odds…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Immigration, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Christian visitors bring hope to immigrant detainees facing tough odds in New Hampshire jail Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Maggie Fogarty, who helped create the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program six years ago, meets with a detainee on Nov. 5 at the Strafford County jail in Dover, New Hampshire. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Dover, New Hampshire] Few items hitch a ride with the Rev. Mark Pendleton through the entrance of the Strafford County Department of Corrections every Monday morning. More important are the words of hope and the friendly smile he transports to the dozens of immigrants locked away inside the jail.“My task is to show a human face, that they’re not a number, they’re a person,” said Pendleton, one of about 10 volunteers with the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program. “We try to be the face of Christ to them in a very tough moment.”After leaving cellphone and wallet in his pickup truck and handing his driver’s license to the desk officer, Pendleton passes through the metal detector. On the other side he collects his keys, a Spanish-language Bible and an accordion folder filled with paperwork detailing past detainee visits and photocopies of legal pamphlets that may help some of the immigrants win release or halt deportation.At a time of deep divisions in American society, when political battles are waged on battlefields far removed from the people affected by federal immigration policies, Pendleton and the visitation team bring no partisan motive to the Dover jail. Their presence promotes no agenda other than a pragmatic compassion rooted in their Christian faith.“The Christian message is a rather redundant message of love and forgiveness,” Pendleton said.The visitors’ assistance is welcomed by supervisors at the Strafford County jail in Dover, one of more than 200 prisons and jails across the country to hold detainees for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, part of the Department of Homeland Security. As the only such facility in New Hampshire, the Dover jail’s immigrant detainee population has increased dramatically in recent years, starting during the Obama administration, when the average daily number of immigrant detainees jumped from 30 in 2015 to 80 in 2016, according to a Concord Monitor report.Episcopalians interested in joining visitation programs or starting their own can find contacts and resources online from Freedom for Immigrants, a California-based nonprofit that tracks and supports such programs.This year, under President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy toward illegal immigration, the 495-bed jail has averaged more than 100 people targeted for federal immigration enforcement. Some are awaiting trial or serving sentences in unrelated criminal cases, but many of the immigrants are being held for no other reason than ICE suspects they are not in the country legally. They may only spend a brief time at the jail before ICE determines their next steps and moves them elsewhere, typically without revealing those moves to jail officials or the visitation team.Episcopal News Service was granted access to the jail’s inmate housing units and meeting rooms to report on the work of the New Hampshire Immigrant Visitation Program, as well as Pendleton’s pastoral care for detainees who request it. ENS, escorted by a jail superintendent, spent much of the morning Nov. 5 shadowing Pendleton and four other volunteers to capture the substance of their interactions with immigrant detainees.To minimize the risk that these normally one-on-one conversations would be hindered by the additional presence of a reporter and jail supervisor, ENS refrained from asking questions of the detainees themselves. ENS also agreed to requests from the jail and the visitation team not to quote detainees directly or by name. The outlines of their stories, however, offer examples of what the visitation team members say are typical scenarios facing the detainees, some of whom are clinging to hope against long odds.The volunteers provide the detainees with general information and guidance about aspects of the immigration system, from applying for asylum to voluntarily leaving the country, though the team is necessarily clear about not being able to provide legal advice. They aren’t attorneys.“A lot of what we’re doing is just listening to people,” said Nancy Pape, one of the lead volunteers. “Just being heard is great for everybody.”Pape created the visitation program about six years ago with Maggie Fogarty, a New Hampshire official with the Quaker organization American Friends Service Committee. Pendleton, rector at Christ Episcopal Church in Exeter, joined the team two years ago, drawn partly by the prospect of putting his knowledge of Spanish to use. Though not officially a faith-based ministry, volunteers often bring a Christian perspective to the work.This Monday, they were joined by two other volunteers, Judith Cole and Sally Fleming. The group signed in around 8:20 a.m. and made its way through a pair of secure doors. Each opened and closed with a mechanical “CHACK-buzz-CHACK” facilitated by some invisible Oz on the other end of the intercom buttons.Down a flight of stairs, through more imposing doors, Jake Collins, the jail’s assistant superintendent for programs, led the way through a maze of halls that he said was designed to maintain an element of mystery. If an inmate somehow were to escape through one of the doors, the next step toward freedom wouldn’t be obvious.Helpful information and a chance to be heardThe detainees are not required to meet with the visitation team. As the volunteers move among housing pods, jail officers make announcements to the units to invite immigrants to come forward if they’d like the assistance. The number of detainees who accept the invitations varies week to week, sometimes depending on how active ICE has been in making arrests over the weekend.Immigrant detainees are most likely to be in their late 20s or early 30s, and 70 percent are jailed on immigration violations for a month or less, according to national statistics kept by Freedom for Immigrants, a California-based nonprofit aimed at ending immigrant detention. Mexico is the detainees’ most common home country, followed by El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, three countries facing high rates of forced displacement by violence.The Dover jail mirrors those trends. Certain Spanish words ring with regularity in the conversations between the detainees and the visitation team.Asking a detainee’s “país,” or country, is one of Pendleton’s icebreaker questions. He received his call to ordained ministry while in Colombia and has been to many of the immigrants’ home countries, allowing him to establish a rudimentary rapport with them in the jail. He and the other volunteers also ask how the detainees entered the United States, and whether they re-entered after a previous deportation, which can complicate the detainees’ efforts to remain in this country.“Familia” is another important detail. Having family members nearby can make a big difference, Pendleton said, as can an “abogado.”“Tienes un abogado?” Do you have an attorney?Without one, a detainee’s long odds become even longer, and there are few lawyers willing to take on immigration cases pro bono unless they see a reasonable chance for success, Pendleton said.The Rev. Mark Pendleton, rector at Christ Episcopal Church in Exeter, New Hampshire, has visited immigrants at the jail in Dover for the past two years. “We try to the be the face of Christ to them in a very tough moment,” he said. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter navigating the hallways and ending up deep inside the facility, the visitation team’s first stop was Housing Pod 1, or HP1 in the jail’s shorthand. Inmates here are assigned to one of several units arranged in an octagon around a raised guard station, from which officers can monitor the inmates’ activity.Units A and B are for female inmates. Unit D is maximum security, for disciplinary cases. Unit E is for inmates with special management needs, such as physical disabilities or court orders that prohibit contact with codefendants. Unit F is intake, for newly arrived inmates as they are evaluated for housing assignments.Unit C is divided in half, and on one side of a cinderblock dividing wall are the non-criminal ICE detainees, the only inmates who wear jail-issued maroon. Strafford County does little else to differentiate them from the general jail population. Like all inmates housed in Dover, “we try to treat them as fairly and humanely as possible,” Collins said.Assistant Superintendent Jake CollinsOn this day, Collins estimated Unit C held about 50 detainees in maroon clothes. As he spoke, he buzzed one man back into the unit to retrieve paperwork.The visitation team began setting up in a sparse meeting room, its off-white walls rising from a trapezoidal floor plan. Fluorescent bulbs radiated light down to the tile floor. Reinforced windows afforded views out to an equally sparse hallway and to an adjoining conference room. In the middle of the room, folding tables were arranged into a square.On one side of the square, Pendleton was speaking in Spanish with an immigrant about his case. Another man was with Fogarty researching an asylum application.Cole, with Pape translating, worked with a third man, who said he was from Nashua, New Hampshire, and wanted to apply for release on bond. Winning release doesn’t guarantee a win on the underlying immigration matter, but mounting a defense is more productive on the outside, in addition to being more comfortable.Immigrants in some cases ask to leave the United States immediately and voluntarily rather than sit in jail indefinitely, Pendleton said.ICE pays $83 a day to Strafford County for each federal detainee held in the Dover jail, and in 2017 those payments totaled nearly $2.8 million, according to the Concord Monitor. The jail, which first began housing ICE detainees in 2009, must pass rigorous federal inspections that check the facility on more than 600 standards, from the temperature of its dishwashers to the labels on its cleaning spray bottles.ICE also must OK the visitation program and its schedule before the volunteers, who receive agency-approved training, are allowed to meet with the detainees. The jail has worked to accommodate the team’s interest in serving these inmates.“If somebody can find something and help these guys out with their case, we encourage it,” Collins said.The Strafford County jail in Dover, New Hampshire, is one of more than 200 prisons and jails in the United States that hold federal immigration detainees and the one such facility in the state. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBehind bars, dozens face uphill immigration battlesAs the group wrapped up its visits with Unit C detainees, Pape moved to a different housing pod to offer assistance to immigrants being held in Unit G, where 72 inmates are monitored by a jail officer stationed behind a desk on the unit’s floor. Instead of maroon, these inmates wear brown to indicate they have active criminal cases pending.The unit is considered high-medium security. Inmates here have a range of amenities, including TVs, laundry facilities, showers and a simple workout area. The jail no longer accepts physical mail addressed to inmates, for security reasons, but each is assigned a durable tablet for receiving email.Pape set up in a meeting room not much different from the first – this time a rectangular floor plan, but the same off-white walls, overhead fluorescent lights, reinforced windows, tile floor. She put her files on a folding table and began talking with an immigrant in a brown jail shirt. He wanted help with paperwork for a child custody case, and handing Pape his jail-issued tablet, he showed her a picture of his girlfriend and their son, who also live in New Hampshire.He has another child in the United States, which is why he re-entered after being deported several times to his native Honduras, Pape said. Because of the re-entries, he was charged with an aggravated felony.“For the general public, you’re thinking something really dangerous, and this is just a case of him wanting to return to his children,” Pape said.Over in Unit H, a mirror image of Unit G, Pendleton asked the jail officer to let the inmates know he was there. She leaned into the intercom: “Gentlemen, we have representatives from immigration here if you’re interested.”Not exactly. “We’re not ICE. We’re volunteers,” he clarified. In the meeting room with the inmates he repeated the clarification in Spanish. “Somos voluntarios. Non somos el gobierno.”Initially he was joined by three men, who said they were from Somalia, Guatemala and El Salvador. A fourth entered behind them.“De qué país?” The late arrival said he was from Mexico.Pendleton first met with the man from Somalia, who had injured his legs in the jail and was seated in a wheelchair. He told Pendleton he had hoped to join a group of other Somali detainees who were sent back to their home country earlier in the year, and he wasn’t sure why federal officials left him behind in Dover.Pendleton said the visitation team would look into it. “You’ll be here next week, chances are, so I’ll update the team,” he said.Next, the man from El Salvador explained his situation, saying in Spanish that he had entered the United States in 2012 after a previous deportation.“Abogado?” Pendleton asked. No, the man said, but his wife and daughter live nearby.After asking the man how he felt about his case, Pendleton acknowledged it was “un poco complicado,” a little complicated, because of the re-entry. Pendleton took notes so the team could follow up next week.New Hampshire may seem a surprising locale for such conversations, with much of the national focus turned to immigration enforcement along the United States’ southern border. Texas, California and Arizona are the states with the largest numbers of immigrant detainees, each state averaging thousands each day, according to Freedom for Immigrants, which maintains a national network of affiliated visitation programs at 55 prisons and jails like the one in Dover.An estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the United States as of 2014, but only 10,000 were in New Hampshire, according to Pew Research Center, out of a statewide population of 1.3 million. Yet New England has become a regional flashpoint in the immigration debate. Immigrants here, legally or not, typically have moved north into the region in search of work or to join family, or they have crossed the border south from Canada, Pendleton said.About 40 people gather Nov. 6 outside the Norris Cotton Federal Building in Manchester, New Hampshire, for one of the ecumenical prayer vigils held in support of immigrants checking in with federal officials. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceSeveral faith-based groups, including the New Hampshire Council of Churches, have held regular vigils outside the federal building in Manchester because immigrants have been told to show up there with increased frequency for ICE check-ins. Some arrive fearing they will be told on the spot to buy an airline ticket to their native country and leave any family members behind, Fogarty said.The groups also organized a Solidarity Walk for Immigrant Justice in August, walking the 40 miles from Manchester to the jail in Dover over four days to raise awareness of the immigrants’ plight and to show support for them and their families.Immigrants, including those facing deportation, also have the support of the Episcopal Church, which in July passed multiple resolutions on immigration issues at its 79th General Convention in Austin, Texas.Messages of hope in times of despairAbout 40 people joined the prayer vigil Nov. 6 outside the Norris Cotton Federal Building in Manchester on a drizzly, overcast Election Day morning. Some participants ministered to the immigrants who arrived for their check-ins throughout the morning, while the rest of group joined a Jericho walk, seven times around the building in silence.“I know that no matter which party is in power, we have lots of creative work to be done,” the Rev. Gayle Murphy, a United Church of Christ pastor, told the participants before the walk.A day earlier, in the Dover jail, Pendleton explained how “difícil,” or difficult, some cases are that he reviews.“Some of these folks are just headed for deportation,” he told ENS. Sometimes, all they have left is hope.Esperanza.When it was the Mexican man’s turn, Pendleton asked his hometown and learned the man was from Vera Cruz. “Mucho calor” – very hot – Pendleton said, trying to break the ice.The young man smiled through a light beard, but his smile didn’t last long. He told Pendleton that he had been living in Danbury, Connecticut, with his family when he was arrested on a traffic violation. That traffic stop revealed he had re-entered the U.S. after a previous deportation.“Es difícil,” Pendleton told the man, whose mouth pinched slightly and face flushed with apparent anguish as the priest identified potential hurdles ahead. “No es imposible.”Not impossible to fight deportation, no, but Pendleton offered the man a photocopy labeled “Voluntary Departure Guide” in case he wanted to take that route instead.“No pierdas esperanza,” he said finally. Don’t lose hope.Pendleton’s last task of the morning was to meet with immigrants who had requested pastoral visits from him. For this, he slipped his white clergy collar into the neck of his black shirt and gave Collins a sticky note with the names.Collins said he would bring one of the inmates on Pendleton’s list into Interview Room S-1, but “the other guy went out this morning,” he said, referring to another inmate on the list who had been taken from the jail by ICE.S-1 was even smaller than the other meeting rooms, about 8-feet squared. Off-white walls. Overhead fluorescents. Reinforced windows. Laminate wood floor.Pendleton placed his Bible on the room’s folding table and took from his folder sheets of paper containing excerpted Bible passages in English and Spanish. Collins brought in an inmate who said he originally was from Costa Rica, and as the man sat down across from Pendleton the conversation alternated between languages.“Your English is good,” Pendleton complimented.The Costa Rican man has lived in the United States for 18 years, and, despite losing his right forefinger in a childhood injury, had been able to find work on a dairy farm in Vermont. He and his wife, who is from Argentina, have three teenage children, all born here. They are churchgoers, he said, and although he wasn’t sure the denomination, Pendleton guessed Episcopal by the man’s description of the church – kind of like a Catholic church, but with a female pastor.The man had been in the jail for a month and wore a green shirt, which Collins had said earlier indicates an inmate serving a criminal sentence, though the man’s crime wasn’t clear. Pendleton remarked that the man seemed upbeat and cheerful despite his difficult circumstances.“Tú lees la Biblia?” Do you read the Bible? The man said he did, and the two of them took turns reading out loud the Spanish passages on Pendleton’s sheets: Isaías 41:10, Salmos 145 and 2 Corintios 4.“Nos derriban, pero no nos destruyen,” St. Paul says in his second letter to the Corinthians.Struck down, not destroyed.“Es la verdad, no?” Pendleton asked. The man agreed, very true.They concluded the pastoral visit by reading the Prayer of St. Francis and the Lord’s Prayer together in Spanish. Their words were still ringing in the air as Pendleton shook the man’s hand and returned him to Collins in the hall.Donde hay ofensa, dar perdón;Donde hay duda, fe;Donde hay desesperación, esperanza.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By David PaulsenPosted Nov 20, 2018 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Episcopal Church eyes investing in gun manufacturers to press for…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Faith & Politics, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Gun Violence Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Bishops United Against Gun Violence, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church eyes investing in gun manufacturers to press for greater gun safety Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY center_img Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopalians join a interfaith group of demonstrators outside a Smith & Wesson facility in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 14. Photo: Victoria Ix/Diocese of Western Massachusetts[Episcopal News Service] Shareholder advocacy is nothing new for the Episcopal Church. With an investment portfolio worth about $400 million, the church has long used some of those investments to influence companies based on Christian principles and General Convention resolutions that set church policies and priorities.What’s new is one of the investment tactics the church plans to implement in the new year to address gun violence.General Convention passed a resolution in July that calls on Executive Council’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility to research investing in gun manufacturers to give the church a new voice in how those companies do business. The goal: “to minimize lethal and criminal uses of their products.”“We’ve never purposely gone out and bought [shares in] what we’d consider a bad actor in order to press the company to change behavior,” said Brian Grieves, the outgoing chair of the committee, which oversees the church’s shareholder advocacy.The resolution, B007, was proposed by Western Massachusetts Bishop Douglas Fisher, a member of Bishops United Against Gun Violence, who will take over for Grieves as committee chair in January. Fisher’s diocese is home to the headquarters of Smith & Wesson in Springfield, and in March he participated in a rally outside the gun manufacturer led by high school students in the wake of a deadly high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.Fisher acknowledged a “sense of frustration” among anti-gun violence advocates in response to Congress’ inaction. “The federal government is doing nothing about the public health crisis of gun violence,” he said. “So where can the church engage this big issue?”Shareholder advocacy already has produced results on the issue, such as the decision by Dick’s Sporting Goods in February to stop selling assault rifles at its Field & Stream stores and to stop selling any guns to customers under 21. The Episcopal Church, as a shareholder, was involved in the effort to pressure the chain based on the Sandy Hook Principles, named after the school in Newtown, Connecticut, where 20 students and six educators were gunned down six years ago, on Dec. 14, 2012.The Dick’s shareholder effort was aided by a coalition called Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility, or ICCR, an organization to which the Episcopal Church belongs that helps religious organizations pool their shareholder power. The group has recently worked with other of its members to do what General Convention urged: buy stock in a gun manufacturing company to influence corporate behavior. Eleven Roman Catholic organizations invested in Sturm, Ruger & Co. and in May were able to pass a shareholder resolution requiring the company to produce a report documenting how it is mitigating the harmful effects of its products.Fisher said the Episcopal Church intends to take its cue from ICCR and base its advocacy with gun manufacturers on principles developed by an anti-gun violence campaign called Do Not Stand Idly By.Such efforts aren’t opposed to gun ownership or the Second Amendment, Fisher said. “We’re really taking the approach of, why can’t gun companies act like car companies? Car companies are already trying to make their cars safer. … That’s good business practice. Why can’t gun companies go down the same path?”That’s a worthwhile case to make to those companies, said the Rev. Rosalind Hughes, a Cleveland-area priest who has been vocal and active in the fight against gun violence, but she isn’t sure investments are the best way to make that case.“My personal feeling is that I would prefer that we were not investing in the manufacture of guns in the first place,” said Hughes, rector at Church of the Epiphany in Euclid, Ohio. She favors greater lobbying efforts to pass stricter background checks, an end to gun-show loopholes and other reform measures. Bishops United Against Gun Violence has backed such measures as well.“The fact that we’re talking about this on the anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting doesn’t escape my notice,” Hughes told Episcopal News Service. “And the idea that the best that we can do is to invest in the manufacture of more guns in order to influence the landscape of guns in this country, that doesn’t sit well with me.”Grieves, who will remain on the Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility after stepping down as chair, describes actively investing in such companies as just one of the alternatives available to the church as it pursues a range of policy goals.“One size does not fit all,” he said. “It’s a strategic decision, and we’re going to have to look at how we arrive at those particular positions.”Even if this approach gets results on gun safety, it may not be the best approach for some of the church’s other priorities, which include climate change, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, indigenous people’s rights, corporate board diversity and an end to human trafficking.The church already owns shares in Caterpillar and Motorola, for example, and for years has been pressing those two companies to address human rights concerns related to their contracts with Israel in the occupied territories.“The purpose is to engage in dialogue and try to get the company to move toward making a change in its behavior,” Grieves said.General Convention, however, stopped short of approving a blanket divestment in Israel, which some critics of Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories have called for. Instead, bishops and deputies passed a resolution that calls on Executive Council to establish a “human rights screen” to determine the criteria that would justify divesting from specific companies based on their track records on human rights.The church also maintains so-called no-buy lists against investing in tobacco companies, for-profit prison companies and companies that earn more than a specific percentage of their business as military contractors.Fisher noted that affirmative investing is another approach the Episcopal Church takes, such as its support for companies doing good work in the Palestinian territories. The Bank of Palestine is one example.On climate change, the church seeks out investments aligned with its interest in caring for God’s creation. In 2015, Fisher’s diocese took the additional step of divesting from companies that profit from fossil fuels.It’s one thing to divest from oil in order to invest in alternative fuels, Fisher said, but that approach doesn’t work well in addressing gun violence. “What would you invest in that would impact the public health crisis of gun violence?”By investing in gun manufacturers, then, the church and its partners may be able to persuade those companies to take steps that will reduce the number of gun deaths. One example would be to adopt technology like fingerprint recognition, familiar to any iPhone user, that would lock guns for everyone except the owner.“Even if you don’t get shareholder resolutions passed, if you stay with it long enough … people start to take notice,” Fisher said. “It’s not something that gets ignored. It gets addressed.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC By David PaulsenPosted Dec 14, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Alternative Rugby Commentary – The Canadian Test

first_imgThursday Jun 14, 2007 Alternative Rugby Commentary – The Canadian Test Another classic from Fraser. This is a preview for the game between the All Blacks & Canada which is coming up on June 16th in Hamilton. Listen to the Alternative Rugby Commentary with Jed Thian on www.arcrugby.co.nz. ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyMen, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill If You Do This (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel ADVERTISEMENT Trending 1 WEEK AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 5 DAYS AGO The time Waisale Serevi used his iconic hitch-kick to carve up Scotland in 2000 Great Tries 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO The time Waisale Serevi used his iconic hitch-kick to carve up Scotland in 2000 1 WEEK AGO Veainu finishes superb try after octopus style offload from Waisea 2 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH REPLAY: Huge stars on show when All Blacks host Pacific Island XV in 2004 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Hooker produces ridiculous speed to score 60-metre wonder try for Hurricanes View All Big Hits & Dirty Play 1 DAY AGO Awesome new Etzebeth montage will have Springboks fans psyched for Summer Lions tour 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 1 WEEK AGO AWESOME video shows the very biggest and best tackles of the 2020/21 season View All See It To Believe It 4 DAYS AGO Cheetah racer Habana reveals what was actually going through his mind that day 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 1 WEEK AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash View All Funnies 2 WEEKS AGO Joe Marler elated in special interview as fans return to The Stoop 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: One of the luckiest and most bizarre tries you will EVER see 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Reds players caught out in hilarious celebration blooper vs Chiefs 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Faz, Piutau and Burns star in hilarious try fail compilation 4 WEEKS AGO MLR: Giltinis howler sees try overruled despite attempts to celebrate View All Amateur 32 WEEKS AGO Viral video of Scottish club brawl goes down a storm with rugby community 69 WEEKS AGO RUGBYDUMP BLITZ: This Best of the Week round up is sure to entertain you 69 WEEKS AGO RD BLITZ – Disaster, just when it looked so promising… 69 WEEKS AGO That glorious moment that will live on forever, like it or not 69 WEEKS AGO RD Blitz – PROP’S Lionel Messi wizardy creates incredible try View All Player Features 16 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bumping off tacklers and taking high balls, Rob Kearney had an impressive Super Rugby debut 21 WEEKS AGO Brian Moore on money in modern rugby and how it should never be compared to ‘outlier’ football 22 WEEKS AGO Tuisova’s wrecking ball montage will make you grateful you never made it as a pro 28 WEEKS AGO New Zealand rugby pod admit Owen Farrell is world class 29 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bath prop launches Amazon documentary focused on those from non-traditional backgrounds View All Related Content from the RugbyPass Network ‘What you do today is how you’re going to be remembered’: Spirit of Rugby – Ep 5 In Spirit of Rugby episode 5, Jim Hamilton talks Lions with Matt Dawson, Jeremy Guscott, Rob Kearney, Simon Shaw, Tom Croft and John Bentley. Watch: Reforging the Steelers | Episode 2 | RugbyPass Original Documentary In Episode 2 of Reforging the Steelers, we follow the team through rounds two to four as they try to get their season on track after an opening loss to competition powerhouses Tasman. Blues secure Trans-Tasman final place despite not scoring in second half versus Force The Blues have secured their place in the inaugural Super Rugby Trans-Tasman final with a 31-21 victory over the Western Force in Auckland. ‘I’d pent-up frustration, a lot I probably didn’t realise’: Marcus Watson’s emotional Wasps return Set to turn 30 later this month, Marcus Watson had an early birthday present last weekend when he finally made it back into the Wasps XV. Gavin Coombes grabs four tries as Munster easy to victory over Zebre Gavin Coombes scored four tries at Zebre as Munster secured second place in the northern section of the Guinness PRO14 Rainbow Cup. Leinster finish with Rainbow flourish as fans attend RDS for first time in 16 months Retiring duo Scott Fardy and Michael Bent bowed out on a winning note as Leinster finished the Rainbow Cup with a victory over Dragons. Alternative Rugby Commentary – The Canadian Test | RugbyDump – Rugby News & Videos RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Sitemap Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Sign In Username or Email Password Stay logged in Forgot password Thank you for registering Click here to login Register Register now for RugbyDump commenting & enewsletter. * Required fields. Username * Password * Email * Password Repeat * Please send me news, information and special offers from RugbyDump By clicking register you agree to our Privacy Policylast_img read more

House Shazai / nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa Architects

first_img 2020 CopyAbout this officenevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesFukushimaOn FacebookTimber InteriorsJapanPublished on December 01, 2020Cite: “House Shazai / nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa Architects” 30 Nov 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – LogisVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteCupa PizarrasVentilated Facade – CUPACLAD UprightGlassLAMILUXGlass Roof PR60ConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsVELUX CommercialAtrium Longlight Skylights in ExperimentariumMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Copper FinishesStonesFranken-SchotterWall Covering & CladdingWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusSwingsStudio StirlingHanging Chair – BasketWallcovering / CladdingArrigoni WoodsWood Cladding – AcousticMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?日本福岛斜材之家 / nevertheless | 佐河雄介建筑事务所是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Houses ArchDaily Architects: nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa Architects Area Area of this architecture project Area:  66 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Manufacturers: IOC, YKK AP, Artunion, KMEW, Lilycolor, TanitaArchitect In Charge:Yusuke SagawaDesign Team:nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa ArchitectsStructural Engineer:Yoshiharu KanebakoCity:FukushimaCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Yosuke HaradaRecommended ProductsWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesText description provided by the architects. The site is located in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, a residential area just a few minutes’ walk to the sea. Although located in the northeastern region of Japan, it is a pleasant area with relatively mild winters and cool beach breezes in the summer.Save this picture!© Yosuke HaradaSave this picture!PlansSave this picture!© Yosuke HaradaThe owner is a couple and a child. Since the owner’s parents live nearby, they requested a place for the family to gather and children to play. Therefore, we moved the building to the north, created a garden on the south side, and created a two-story terrace between the hall and garden. By enclosing the two-story terrace with columns and braces, the structure serves as a screen while remaining open.Save this picture!© Yosuke HaradaInside the house, the first floor consists of all the common areas and the second floor has the private rooms. Through small windows, a tiny light penetrates into the living room from each bedroom.Save this picture!© Yosuke HaradaThe building is made up of braced shinkabe walls (walls with exposed columns) around its perimeter and ookabe walls (walls with unexposed columns) on the inside. The shinkabe walls are covered with clear painted lauan plywood and the interior ookabe walls are finished with white wallpaper. All rooms have white walls and are supported by wooden frame structures and the ceiling is exposed to reveal the sloped roof. The interior spaces are not large, but we expected to create a variety of expressions by varying the height of the ceilings and the range of materials.Save this picture!© Yosuke HaradaSave this picture!Elevations and SectionsSave this picture!© Yosuke HaradaIn this house, we tried to create spaces that play with the idea of duality, mediating between opposing elements and concepts such as lines and surfaces, varying scales, structures and facades, light and shadow, and demolition and construction. We hope that these contradictions in space will be a place where the inhabitants can experience new insights and create fresh perspectives and relationships.Save this picture!© Yosuke HaradaProject gallerySee allShow lessNgamwongwan House / Junsekino Architect and DesignSelected ProjectsRenovation of Yulin Building / epos architectureSelected Projects Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/952357/house-shazai-nevertheless-yusuke-sagawa-architects Clipboard Projects CopyHouses•Fukushima, Japan “COPY”center_img ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/952357/house-shazai-nevertheless-yusuke-sagawa-architects Clipboard Year:  Photographs Save this picture!© Yosuke Harada+ 28Curated by Hana Abdel Share House Shazai / nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa Architects Japan Photographs:  Yosuke Harada Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project House Shazai / nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa ArchitectsSave this projectSaveHouse Shazai / nevertheless / Yusuke Sagawa Architects “COPY”last_img read more

Reconstruction Of The Tower At Sint-Amandscollege / SAMYN and …

first_img Reconstruction Of The Tower At Sint-Amandscollege / SAMYN and PARTNERS City:KortrijkCountry:BelgiumMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersRecommended ProductsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedConcreteKrytonConcrete Hardening – Hard-CemFiber Cements / CementsApavisaTiles – Nanofusion 7.0WoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeText description provided by the architects. The importance of the vertical development of cities. The vertical development of cities is one of the foundations of future urbanism for the sake of preserving the natural and agricultural territories. The verticality is the result of common sense but the livability of vertical housing remains, as its architecture, to be elaborated in order to give rise to a community of inhabitants. For decades, Philippe Samyn conceived proposals in this direction (see, for example, his essay “The Vertical City” published by the Royal Academy of Belgium in September 2014).Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe project of the K-Tower is an integral part of this vision. It is about offering quality apartments instead of beautiful villas arranged in the periphery, the latter being too excessive, both in land consumption and in the development of urban networks. The site. The site of the Sint-Amandscollege is located inside Kortrijk’s periphery, on the bank of the river Leie. The current school buildings strongly vary in appearance as they were constructed at different ages.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersSave this picture!PlanSave this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe “Collegetoren” was built in 1960 to house a boarding school; its base houses additional educational facilities. As the “Collegetoren” no longer meets the current needs, the Kortrijk Urban Development Board launched a competition in 2005 for its reassignment and the rehabilitation of the Collège buildings themselves. A thorough analysis of the existing situation concluded that the tower had to be demolished and that the base should be maintained.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe implantation of the tower. A tower does not set itself anywhere. The new tower is thus situated on the east side of the remaining base, next to Albert Park. This position reinforces the image of the base and closes the ensemble in a logical way. Placed on the bank of the river Leie, the tower is the visual link between the dense city and its vast green periphery. It offers views of an exceptionally wide extent.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe form. Based on a rectangular plan of 1 to 2, the tower is slender to limit its shadow. It presents the city with its finest silhouette. Its visual slenderness is accentuated by the luminous appearance of its envelope of white sheet, satin mirror and polished mirror. The senses. The book “A Pattern Language” by Christopher Alexander, qualified by Françoise Choay as the only theoretical work on architecture after Vitruvius, forms, with the “plastic number” of Hans Dom Van der Laan on the proportions, a part of the theoretical foundations on which all the reflections of Philippe Samyn are based.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersPhilippe Samyn has likewise always been concerned about the respect of the five human senses and particularly the respect of natural light. A special attention is paid here as well to the visual, acoustic, olfactory and tactile qualities.  The most striking feature is the significant use of mirrors and glass with a high color rendering index on the façade, which increases the brightness in the building as well as on the terraces.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersOrientation and views. The proposed development for the interior of the tower, consisting of 65 apartments, is flexible. Around a central core containing circulations and techniques, it is possible to provide two, three or four apartments per floor. A loft, including a double height living room, occupies the top floor. With its east-west orientation, the tower offers far-reaching perspectives on the river Leie while its slim south facade enjoys views over the historic center of the city.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe plan allows at least two orientations for each unit and their alternating wide terraces. The double height of the latter provides abundant sunshine and natural light of high quality inside the apartments. The mantillas of perforated sheet around the terraces ensure the privacy of the apartments and protects them from the draughts. The openings, created at each terrace and each apartment, frame exceptional views in the manner of paintings. The facade. Any construction is characterized by seven orders of magnitude waymarking the visual field, like the keyboard of a well-tempered piano has seven octaves expanding over the hearing field. The readability of these orders is essential to attain visual harmony. Architecture must ensure its materiality.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersThe large facades of the tower are thus divided into subsets nested in increasingly small dimensions, each of which is materialized by a different treatment based on internal comfort and the intake of natural light: white, mirrored or satin finish reflective surfaces. This découpage, associated with the terraces wrapped in perforated sheet metal, makes it possible to gradually switch from the large urban scale and vast landscape to the size of the door handle. It also ensues that the kinetic image of the tower is always different depending on the time of day and the day of the year.Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and PartnersProject gallerySee allShow lessRotating Triumf Arch / KATARSIS abSelected ProjectsIndustrial or Natural Future: Is It Possible to Create Organic Cities Shaped by Tech…ArticlesProject locationAddress:Diksmuidekaai 11, 8500 Kortrijk, BélgicaLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956514/reconstruction-of-the-tower-at-sint-amandscollege-samyn-and-partners Clipboard Architects: Philippe Samyn and Partners Area Area of this architecture project 2018 Save this picture!Courtesy of Philippe Samyn and Partners+ 42Curated by Matheus Pereira Share Apartments Area:  11348 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyAbout this officePhilippe Samyn and PartnersOfficeFollowProductsGlassConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsBuildingsResidentialKortrijkMies van der Rohe AwardBelgiumPublished on February 09, 2021Cite: “Reconstruction Of The Tower At Sint-Amandscollege / SAMYN and PARTNERS” 09 Feb 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Sint-Amandscollege塔楼改造 / SAMYN and PARTNERS是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream CopyApartments, Residential•Kortrijk, Belgiumcenter_img Year:  Projects ArchDaily “COPY” “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956514/reconstruction-of-the-tower-at-sint-amandscollege-samyn-and-partners Clipboard Reconstruction Of The Tower At Sint-Amandscollege / SAMYN and PARTNERSSave this projectSaveReconstruction Of The Tower At Sint-Amandscollege / SAMYN and PARTNERS Belgiumlast_img read more

New United Way website to save $20,000 per year

first_imgNew United Way website to save $20,000 per year  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 25 February 2005 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis In the USA, United Way of Delaware, which manages fundraising campaigns on behalf of a number of local nonprofits, has announced that its new web-based system will save it over $20,000 a year.The new web site, rolled out to 4,000 nonprofits, allows them to login securely and download their updated donor lists and funds transfer reports directly from the site.The web site was developed by Helix and is fully integrated with the United Way back-office campaign management system ‘Andar’, also developed by Helix. “We have been working closely with the United Way of Delaware to design the web pages” said Real Bedard, vice president at Helix. “We used our existing integrated online pledging technology base to deliver live data from our Andar database directly to agencies.” Advertisementcenter_img Tagged with: Digital Research / statistics Technology “The new web site not only saves us money, it also saves our agencies money” said Wayne Meadows, IT Director of the United Way. “Agencies now have access to information as it becomes available to us.”United Way of Delaware’s annual campaign is supported by more than 90,000 individuals, including employee donors at nearly 1,000 Delaware workplaces. Helix is a provider of enterprise-wide fundraising and community support software to nonprofit organisations. Helix’ Andar Fundraising Software is an integrated suite of products that offers fundraising campaign management, online giving, allocation of funds, outcomes measurements, volunteer matching, and other services. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Five highlights from the Parade of Lights

first_imgGrains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Twitter Facebook + posts Linkedin Facebook The University of Houston-Downtown Linkedin Paris Jones is a senior news and media studies major from Mason, Texas. She serves a managing editor for TCU360.com. One of her proudest accomplishments is her ability to drink a half liter bottle of water in seven seconds. printThe XTO Energy Parade of Lights lit up the streets of downtown Fort Worth Sunday night.The parade included 125 entries and took about two hours to finish. It’s expanded significantly since the first XTO Energy Parade of Lights, in 1983, which featured only 25 units.While thousands of people came out to watch the floats, bands and groups, hundreds left before the show ended.Here are five highlights from Sunday’s parade for anyone who couldn’t stick around for the entire thing.5. The horses wearing little hats:Horses wearing little Santa hats pull a carriage during the parade. Photo by Andrew Van Heusden.Few things are more adorable than horses pulling carriages covered in Christmas lights. However, horses wearing little hats while pulling carriages covered in Christmas lights give it some competition.4. The small herd of Shetland ponies:Some shetland ponies pull mini carriages during the parade. Photo by Andrew Van Heusden.Take each cute element listed above and imagine it smaller.That’s exactly what happened with this entry.3. Giant balloon characters:The Canary and Bluebird balloons being escorted down the street. Photo by Andrew Van Heusden.The Angry Birds franchise may have left most of its relevance back in 2013, but that doesn’t stop the birds from making appearances in nearly every major parade in America and the Parade of Lights was no exception. The Angry Birds Cardinal, Canary and Bluebird floated along in the parade behind Sesame Street’s Big Bird.2. The Grinch riding a unicycle while playing the clarinet:“The Grinch” rides a unicycle in the Parade of Lights while playing clarinet. Photo by Andrew Van Heusden.The DFW Unicycle Club had over a dozen members riding unicycles with Christmas lights in the parade, but this one stood out.1. Ronald the Ramblin’ Rattler and his “tongue”:It’s hard to miss a bicyclist powered light-up snake.It’s was even harder to miss that snake when it opened its mouth to show a woman wearing pink leggings whose only mission was to do leg lifts so she looked like a tongue.For a complete list of the parades entries, visit the parade’s website. Twitter Paris Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paris-jones/ TCU holds fourth annual TCU Gives Day to gather donations for the universitycenter_img ReddIt Paris Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paris-jones/ Paris Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paris-jones/ ReddIt Paris Jones Paris Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/paris-jones/ Off campus shooting incident ‘not a random act,’ no TCU students involved Previous articleWomen’s basketball beats undefeated SMU, 76-67Next articleTCU students will breathe deep to fight lung cancer Paris Jones RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ‘The Office Gif Club’ GroupMe gives hundreds of students an Office gif a day Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more